Jump to content

Ian Small

Evernote Staff
  • Content Count

    5
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    3

Ian Small last won the day on June 13

Ian Small had the most liked content!

Community Reputation

42 Good

9 Followers

About Ian Small

Profile Information

  • Subscription
    BUSINESS

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. Hi everyone - Dropping back out of lurking mode to provide some additional insight and to reflect on some of the threads above…. There is lots of valuable feedback in this discussion - thank you! I’m sorry if we have disappointed some of you with a perceived lack of responsiveness in the comment threads on these videos. As you would probably expect, our top priority is listening for input and watching for new insights that emerge from these forums and also from all the other community and social mechanisms through which these videos are distributed. During initial design, we focus on talking to and learning from individual users. When we move into preview releases, we engage one-on-one with tens and hundreds of users. As we ramp tests to thousands, tens of thousands and ultimately into millions of users, we start looking increasingly to quantitative data to inform how successful we are being because the conversation doesn't scale otherwise. That’s just the simple mechanics of how things need to work at the scale of Evernote. Concretely, the new note editor has been out in preview release with select Evernote web users for the last 75 days, ramping from a few hundred users trialing very early builds to now thousands of users kicking the tires in a larger-scale (but still early) beta. In the private discussion attached to that original preview program, the conversation around some of the same topics raised here has been intense, resulting not just in bug fixes but also in changes in design and implementation that we are still continuing to work on as I type this. Understandably, we have focussed our energy on going back and forth with and supporting users who are evaluating this build for us in the wild. (Some of you on this discussion are also involved in the private preview program discussion; thank you for your feedback and contributions there!) This is not to say that we don’t value your responses to these videos. As I said above, we read every one to look for new insights and observations. In general, I think that the early response to the first few Behind the Scenes videos has proven that our decision to start communicating with the community through this video mechanism has been a good one. However, I recognize that as we increase this style of communication out to you, it naturally bumps up your expectation of our ability to be able to engage both interactively and on a lot of fronts at the same time. We’ll do our best to engage as we are able, but our priorities internally are clear: First and foremost, we need to focus on shipping quality software that delivers the more coherent and consistent Evernote experience that I blogged about earlier this year. We are still relatively early in that process; we have a long way to go. When we are able to engage, we try to prioritize interactions that inform us of how to refine the software in flight, or to identify and eliminate bugs. That means we won’t necessarily be able to circle around to catch everyone up across all the different communication channels and all the threads. Apologies. And finally, I want to get us out of the habit of making promises we don’t meet. I am not a fan of making commitments we're not 100% sure we can deliver on. So unfortunately that means most of your questions about additional feature X, anticipated delivery date Y, and what about Z - no matter how reasonable! - are likely going to go unanswered until we can back up an answer with facts, or better yet, software. I truly appreciate your ongoing patience with us while we focus as much energy as we are able to muster on building a better Evernote for you. We are trying to test everything we are doing early and often. And we continue to listen to the feedback from those tests and to evolve in response to that feedback. Finally, for those of you who have stuck with this post this far… we know tags are super important to a significant percentage of our user base. (As an aside, we’re trying to improve support for them on Evernote implementations where tags are currently and inexplicably somewhat second-class citizens.). Tags in the modern Evernote web environment aren’t hidden behind a click. They have always been shown at the bottom of the note editor screen (a particularly observant s2sailor noticed this in the video - full points!), which is different than where they are on the Windows build or on the Mac build. There are advantages to this, and as has been observed in this thread, there are also clearly some disadvantages as well. This continues to be a source of ongoing discussion internally. Going back to lurking now. And probably shooting another video in my copious spare time... ian
  2. I really will go back to lurking soon, but while we're at it... To your (1), I will observe that one of the things we showed in the video was the ability for to type the first few letters of a tag or a notebook, have that tag or notebook be automatically suggested, and add it as a filter (eg. "Mexico" was a tag). I understand that incremental search may not be up your alley, but I suspect that for most users, auto-matching what you are typing to possible tag names, notebook names, space names, recent searches, etc. is faster, more interactive, and likely more effective than needing to type or pick "tag:" or "notebook:" first, followed by auto-matching and picking. Our goal is to design for the breadth of the constituency (both paying and non-paying, although we pay the most attention to paying users and those who are likely to become paying users). I completely understand your mileage on a given design approach may vary. To your (2), obviously this is a super power user capability. We have been looking at various options around what the default search logic is, and we have contemplated what full boolean logic would take. One of the things you'll find about me is that I don't make promises that I don't know that I'm going to deliver on. In this area, while we have been and are looking at it, no promises at this point. Thanks for investing the time to respond. -- ian
  3. At a high level: web, mac, windows all roughly the same. Android, iOS roughly the same. Math left as an exercise to the reader... -- ian
  4. Hey gang - There is some useful feedback in this thread which I have read with interest. Thank you! There are also a lot of concerns raised, whether it be feedback to the specific content we showed, or all sorts of interpolations and extrapolations built off what we showed (and in some cases, what we didn't). I don't have time to respond to every possible angle raised in this thread, but here are a few quick responses: 1. Roughly 12% of Evernote usage is on web sessions. 2. No one ever said anything about making Evernote a web-only experience. Just because we demo a set of improvements to search on web (which is the least adequate search experience, btw) doesn't mean this is the only thing we are working on. In a series of videos that may well have a lot of episodes by the time we're done (depending on the response we get, I guess), we judged it to be a reasonably approachable initial subject for a first video. Why? It's relatively easy to understand. It's visual. 3. Following up on #2 above, we are NOT planning on eliminating Windows and Mac versions of Evernote with local stores, nor Android and iOS versions with local stores, etc. Being able to use Evernote whether online or offline is a major feature/benefit and in a million years that's not going away. Of course, having a local store would be even better if sync was fully robust. Working on that. 4. Having the kind of interactive search capability we outline here doesn't mean we're taking away your power search capabilities. It means we're trying to find ways to (a) more quickly get to the content you're looking for *without* needing to know quite as much of the search instruction arcana (b) give more people more powerful search tools (c) get there in fewer keystrokes. I'm sure we'll get some things wrong along the way, but we're trying to have our cake (improved UX, improved relevancy, more interactive search tools) and eat it too (powerful command line syntax) on this front. 5. As I said in the first video in this series, some of what we choose to show in this series won't relate to a problem you in particular are facing. Hopefully some of it will. I recognize it's frustrating if the first video we drop doesn't relate to your top pain point, but you can rest assured that there are others amongst our millions of users who do. Otherwise we wouldn't be working on it. We can only do one topic at a time. 6. One of the reasons we prototype a lot of new stuff on the web first is because it's absolutely the fastest way for us to design/test/validate/deploy something new to a limited set of customers in order to get a feedback loop going about a particular design direction. As I said in the very first video, we are trying to test - with users, live in the wild - as much of what we are working on as we can prior to release. If seeing what we're working on in a web setting disturbs you simply because we are showing a concept in a web build, I'm guessing that for your own peace of mind, you should probably stop watching much of the Behind the Scenes series of videos. 7. If you *do* get invited to participate in a Preview release of some kind, as part of that we will point out to you that Preview is definitionally pre-Alpha. Which means more than "it's buggy". It means it's not even close to feature complete. It's not performant. It's so early there isn't a proper name for it. But if there's enough in there for us to get directional feedback early in the process, we will do our best to put it in front of some users, live and in the wild. Because the earlier we get feedback, the better chance we have of being ultimately on target. All we will ask of you is not to pre-judge the eventual release of something by its Preview release, a release that may come months before we lock down direction, functionality or performance. Previews usually come along with non-disclosure requests, too, because they're so early. Which is one reason you (appropriately) don't hear a lot about them. I'll return to lurking now (and get back to my day job, which ultimately is where I have the best chance of generating value for you all). Thanks for watching, and for caring. I recognize that the last part - that you care - comes through in every comment. ian
×
×
  • Create New...