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Mel Matsuoka

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About Mel Matsuoka

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  1. I paste in a lot of code into Evernote documents (usually from Sublime Text), and am constantly annoyed when my double-quotes are converted into "curly quotes" when I paste them into Code Blocks. Is there a way to disable this? It drives me crazy!
  2. Unfortunately, no. Evernote has publicly stated that they don't think that account switching is important enough to users to continue supporting that feature. so they removed it, despite the fact that the Desktop clients still support it, which really makes no sense. It's a shame, because the Web Clipper did at one point support on-the-fly account switching, and it was awesome.
  3. Good point, however, as far as this specific complaint goes, Apple did not remove Smart Zoom functionality from the green button. They just changed its default behavior (alt-clicking the green button performs the original Smart zoom behavior). Even Apple recognized in this instance that they HAD to give users a choice in this regard, even though they boldly decided to change the fundamental default behavior of a UI control that longtime Mac users expect. I mentioned in another post that CocoaTech added the ability to restore colored sidebar icons in the recently released Path Finder 7. It's a simple Appearance toggle in the PF7 preferences. Path Finder 6 "followed" Apple's sidebar conventions back when Lion came out, and was ostensibly hoping/expecting/wondering that users would get used to the new UI convention. The appearance of the new Appearance option in Path Finder 7 seems to indicate that in the long run, this was not a popular design decision, and as such they are now giving users a choice in the way the sidebar looks. "Opinionated Design" is a valid software-deisgn philosophy. But it's not appropriate for all types of products. Evernote is one of them. No doubt a lot of people like this new EN design (or at least they think they do...much like how I thought I "liked" the monochrome sidebar when Lion was first released), but obviously a much larger group of die-hard Evernote users don't like it. But Evernote doesn't seem to be interested in giving users the same kind of "choice" that even Apple acknowledges it needs to offer its users, in regards to fundamental UI conventions. It's a rather concerning state of affairs. The fact that Evernote--without much good reason--removed account switching from it's web clipper , does not instill a lot of confidence that they are sensitive to the needs of "power users" (aka the very users that made their product what it is today)
  4. I disagree with your unquestioning loyalty to the new Evernote 6 UI design, but in the interest of fairness, I do believe you are correct that JMichael's Finder screen grab portrays an inaccurate view of the "real" Yosemite Finder. It appears that he is using the "TotalFinder" tweak, which restores colored sidebar icons, as well as the characteristic "Chrome" style tabs: http://totalfinder.binaryage.com/tweaks None of this changes the fact that Apple's UI & usability standards for the Finder are extremely questionable, as I posted about in another thread. This is not just a simple issue of being "resistant to change". As a matter of fact, on the whole, I totally love the new Yosemite UI. But monochrome/low-contrast sidebars still makes for extremely bad usability. Your point about how a background app appears when another app is in the foreground, such as Safari, is well taken...but it seems like truly grasping at straws to defend the value of the new low-con EN6 look with that specific use case. I'd hazard to guess that most people are more concerned with how the app they're running in the foreground looks, even if the UI design of an underlying background app may look more distracting than they would prefer. Your points are well taken. And they make sense. However monochrome sidebar is the same in finder, mail, contacts, reminders... And just about every apple app... So only thing I don't understand is how you can be on-board with Yosemite UI but not with Evernote's integration of the same principles. Oh don't get me wrong, I there are very few instances where I find monochrome sidebars acceptable. In fact, I'm hard pressed to think of a single example. I use Mail.app every day, but the monochrome sidebar still drives me insane, nearly as much as it does in Finder. Even though I singled out the Finder, I think Apple is wrong about this UI convention, wherever it happens to use it. But the argument here (well, at least my argument) is that just because Apple does it, doesn't make it right. Uncritically mimicking these conventions only makes it compliant with Apple's current design preferences. But the fact is, Apple has made a LOT of UI mistakes which it later changed its mind on. I think that most of the disgruntled EN6 users here are just annoyed that Evernote's UI/UX team seems to be just blindly following the latest "fads" in OS X UI design, giving more weight to aesthetics, without giving much thought as to how these aesthetic changes affects the usability of their product. And then when we complain about it, Evernote points its finger at Apple, in so many words saying "well if we're wrong about the new UI, then I guess you're all saying that Apple is wrong, tool!" I think a lot of us would agree that Apple is wrong about a lot of things, as far as UI goes, and we wish that Evernote's design team would recognize that fact, and design for what's right for the usability of the Evernote app, and not for 100% compliance to the Yosemite HIG.
  5. What's horrible about this statement is that--despite my overall approval of the new Yosemite UI conventions--I think a lot of people would agree (including John Siracusa) that the Finder still remains the one major UI blunder Apple made in Yosemite. Saying that Finder does anything better than Evernote 6 is a rather scathing indictment of the Evernote 6 UI.
  6. I disagree with your unquestioning loyalty to the new Evernote 6 UI design, but in the interest of fairness, I do believe you are correct that JMichael's Finder screen grab portrays an inaccurate view of the "real" Yosemite Finder. It appears that he is using the "TotalFinder" tweak, which restores colored sidebar icons, as well as the characteristic "Chrome" style tabs: http://totalfinder.binaryage.com/tweaks None of this changes the fact that Apple's UI & usability standards for the Finder are extremely questionable, as I posted about in another thread. This is not just a simple issue of being "resistant to change". As a matter of fact, on the whole, I totally love the new Yosemite UI. But monochrome/low-contrast sidebars still makes for extremely bad usability. Your point about how a background app appears when another app is in the foreground, such as Safari, is well taken...but it seems like truly grasping at straws to defend the value of the new low-con EN6 look with that specific use case. I'd hazard to guess that most people are more concerned with how the app they're running in the foreground looks, even if the UI design of an underlying background app may look more distracting than they would prefer.
  7. +1 on this. There is obviously something to be said for "rolling with" the UI standards and conventions set by the underlying base OS. However, just because Apple unilaterally sets a UI convention, does not automatically make it a good or correct convention that developers should implement unquestioningly as if it were the infallible word of God. Case in point: The monochome Finder sidebar, introduced in OS X Lion. When they first introduced this "feature", I actually thought it looked "nice", "clean" and "tasteful". But the more I used Lion in real-world, it became painfully clear to me that––aesthetics nowisthstanding–Apple made a horrible mistake in draining the color out of the sidebar. I found myself having a difficult time quickly scanning and targeting sidebar items, because where before I subconsciously associated sidebar items by both shape AND color, losing the color from the icons forced my eyes to work harder to find the item that I needed to click on. 40 months later, and nearly 20,000+ hours of living with the monochrome Finder sidebar, I STILL have great difficulty finding sidebar targets without having to actually think about it. I have to resort to using unstable Finder tweaks like "SideEffects" or Finder replacements like Path Finder, just to restore an important usability feature that shouldn't have been removed to begin with. Things like this aren't simply a matter of aesthetic taste, or resistance to change. When I switched to the Mac full-time, 12 years ago, I hated a lot of Mac conventions, such as sorting folder-names alphabetically with file-names. 12 years of being a Windows user will do that to you. But after using OS X on a daily basis, I quickly came around to the wisdom of sorting folders the Mac way. So I'm totally open to new and different ways of doing things. But the fact that even after 3 years of daily "monochrome-sidebar" Finder usage, I still have problems scanning and targeting it's sidebar items indicates to me that Apple was--and continues to be--totally wrong about this UI change, despite what the HIG may say in its defense. Even CocoaTech relented on Path Finder 6's strict adherence to Lion's monochrome sidebar when they released Path Finder 7, no doubt due to many usability complaints from its user base (it's now an Appearance option in the preferences, so they at least give you a choice, in case you happen to like the monochrome sidebar). New UI ideas are great, but to blindly (no pun intended) overturn the UI and usability of a tool that countless people use every day for important workflows just because "that's the way Apple does it", is to miss the point that the "G" in HIG stands for "guidelines", and not "gospel". Evernote's continual deflection of the 6.0 criticism back onto Apple is disingenuous, because Apple is not forcing them to have 100% pixel-perfect adherence to Yosemite's UI conventions. Evernote, you need to do the right thing for the app and the way your users want to use your app, even if the best way to meet those goals is to "violate" portions of the Yosemite HIG.
  8. I recently posted about a rather annoying regression/change in the way the "Move to Notebook" shortcut behavior behaves in EN 5.7 (Mac desktop client), and I'm sorry to report that the issue still exists in EN 6.0.1 https://discussion.evernote.com/topic/75791-small-but-annoying-regression-in-move-to-notebook-feature/ Basically, If you are editing the Title of a note, the "Move to Notebook" keyboard shortcut does not work until you click off of the Title field. This is really annoying, because my muscle memory gained from using Evernote over the years is such that I like to define the notebook to the note I have just created, before I start writing the actual note itself (discovering this shortcut years ago was a godsend, because too often, I would forget to file notes in the appropriate notebook after spending a lot of time creating it) This appears to be a genuine bug, because this behavior does not occur if you physically click the "Move to Notebook" item in the "Note/Move to Notebook…" menu. My workaround is to use Keyboard Maestro to map the "^⌘M" shortcut key to physically select the "Move to Notebook" menu item. But it would be nice if you didn't have to do it this way, since most people don't own Keyboard Maestro, I would imagine.
  9. I've noticed that recently in the 5.7.x Mac client releases, the keyboard shortcut for "Move to Notebook" no longer works if the Note Title field is currently selected for editing. In order to move the currently active note to another notebook, you need to hit "Enter" to deactivate the field, then execute the "Move to Notebook" shortcut. This "modal" shortcut behavior seems like a bug to me, unless someone else can explain the rationale for changing this behavior. Obviously, this is not a huge "bug", but as someone who pushes dozens of notes through my Evernote client every day using keyboard shortcuts, it's just big enough to be really annoying, esp. since it used to work as expected in the pre 5.7 versions.
  10. The biggest (and saddest) irony of this statement is that ever since you guys "depreciated" the (allegedly) infrequently-used account switching feature in the Web Clipper, the less and less I've actually been using the Web Clipper, and have reverted to manually copying & pasting content into my Evernote accounts, like a gosh-darned Neanderthal. Using Evernote shouldn't be a painful, friction-fraught experience every time you need to use one of its core features. And I have a really difficult time reconciling the continuing existence of account switching in the desktop clients, with the claim that account switching was removed in the Web Clipper because nobody used it. I think all we're looking for here is the answer to one of two following questions: 1) Can you PLEASE––for the love of every $DEITY from every major world religion–-bring back account switching to the Web Clipper? 2) Can you just cut to the chase, and let us know if the whole concept of "account switching" in general will eventually be deprecated across ALL of Evernote's client apps, so that we can all get on with our lives and stop grasping on to the thinnest, tenuous threads of hope that you will change your mind and listen to the very real needs of your devoted "Power User" client base?
  11. Usually you hear horror stories of people losing data because they didn't backup, but in my case, my horror story is due to a slip of the mouse, and I accidentally selected "Restore Deleted Notes" when right-clicking on the Evernote "Trash", instead of "Empty Trash". Now I am staring in horror, watching Evernote restore hundreds of deleted and redundant notes to my account, because the "Restore Deleted Notes" option does not warn you that it's about to restore the deleted notes and give you an option to abort the operation. I dont suppose there is any way to "undo" a "Restore Deleted Notes" operation, is there? If not, I would like to submit a formal Feature Request to the Evernote Mac development team to implement a modal warning dialog box to this feature, so as to avoid mistakes like this. Either that, or implement a user-definable "Empty Trash after xx days/hours/weeks" option, so the magnitude of making such an error won't be as bad as accidentally restoring notes from an infinitely non-expiring Trash folder.
  12. Thanks jbignert, The only reason that I purchased two separate Evernote Premium accounts for my work and personal use was because of the addition of account switching. Previously, I was using a single Premium account to juggle both work and personal stuff. Needless to say, this was a total nightmare. When you guys added account switching, I was absolutely ecstatic, because it removed a major hurdle in making Evernote the foundation of my information & research workflow. If account switching is not reinstated to the Clipper, I will probably end up canceling my 2nd paid Premium account and go back to suffering with the old way of doing things, in a single account. That would really stink, for hopefully obvious reasons. What makes Evernote so great is that it is flexible enough to cater to all levels of users, from the simplest recipe-collection tasks, to complicated, intensive information gathering workflows. However, with the removal of account switching (and the rather cavalier public dismissal of its usefulness) It makes me incredibly nervous that Evernote is changing its focus to catering to novice users, at the expense of the very "power users" who are doing amazing things with your product, and whom you like to spotlight in your marketing materials. My snarky comment regarding Skitch wasn't 100% snark. The removal of this feature reminds me of the absolute trainwreck that you guys caused with the Skitch acquisition and the inexplicable removal of nearly every single feature that made Skitch such a great tool to begin with. I just dont want this to happen to Evernote, because it is in my list of top 5 favorite apps that I use on my Mac every day, and it has revolutionized the way I do business. Thanks again for your consideraton.
  13. Holy Hell, are you FREAKING KIDDING ME?!?!?! The ability to switch accounts in the web clipper is absolutely critical to my company's productivity workflow. It makes absolutely no sense to deprecate (the word is "deprecate", btw...not "depreciate") this feature in the web clipper, when the same feature exists in the Desktop client. The improvements to the new clipper are amazing and most welcome, but removing account switching is most definitely a regression, and I'm wondering just how you're determining that nobody actually used this feature, because I can't imagine that many "power users" of Evernote Premium––who are paying a "premium" to maintain separate Evernote accounts for both work and personal purposes––did not use this incredibly useful feature. Did the Skitch acquisition team dictate this change?, because it is incredibly hostile to your users who are using Evernote to do real work, and not just clipping recipes off of the web. Please consider bringing this feature back.
  14. Piling on this request! Evernote markets itself as a platform for organizing and collecting everything in your digital life, so it really requires a level of sorting granularity that makes using EN a pleasure, rather than a pain to use. There are some notebooks I have that I always want to see sorted alphabetically (i.e. my "inventory" notebook), and some that I always want to see sorted by last updated date/time (i.e. invoices). Not being able to set different sorting schemes for notebooks is aggravating to say the least, and until EN adds per-notebook sorting settings, I have to resort to all kinds of ugly note-naming taxonomy to override the global sort scheme (such as pre-pending note titles with hardcoded tags, like "[20121205-0712]" if I want the notebook to sort by date/time).
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