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jsrnephdoc

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About jsrnephdoc

  1. My other heavily used extension in Safari is 1Password Mini. The publisher makes me aware when that's updated. I've never found myself running a version that's 5 releases obsolete.
  2. My guess is that this bug appeared as a result of an interim update to Mac OS. However, there is still an issue. Evernote informs us of new versions of the application, both in Mac OS and in iOS, but it does not inform us of new versions of the Safari extension. Why is that?
  3. Thanks for that! I'd expected the search result to consist of a few emails I'd explicitly forwarded to Evernote via placing my Evernote Address in the "To" field in the destination field of share links on email accounts. In actuality, there were a FLOOD of emails that had come in because I'd applied a colored flag in Mail app that a "send message to Evernote" script recognized as a "receipt"
  4. Post title says it all. The reason I'm interested in doing this is because the other day a note appeared in my Evernote database that was supposedly an email addressed to one of my "ordinary" email addresses (not the one associated with my Evernote username. I received the same message (addressed to me) in my email client. One explanation for this is that someone actually hacked my Mac "Contacts" address book. That's supposedly not possible unless someone has physical custody of my Mac and knowledge of my login credentials. That's not happened. Another is that perhaps I sent somethingl to someone I correspond with frequently by inserting his email address into a "share this" link on a web page or a file repository and simultaneously created a new Evernote note using the same link interface. I have no idea whether that would arrive at my correspondent's computer with a wrapper that listed cc recipients or "to" recipients, including my "import this into Evernote" address, but that's the only explanation I can think of that explains how someone or some bot would gain access to my "import this into Evernote" email address, unless that import routine involves an initial hop to the internet that's not secure. I've used the email route to adding notes to my Evernote database extremely rarely, so if I could search for all the notes I've created via this route, I might be able to clarify what's befallen me. Can anyone enlighten me on this? Thanks so much,
  5. I've just discovered a note in my own inbox that meets these criteria. Curious thing is that it was addressed not to my cryptic "mail it to my Evernote" email address, but to the email address I've maintained for two decades and remains usable only because of the watchful algorithms in the OS X app "Spamsieve." My inference is that BOTH my Evernote email address and conversational email address have been harvested by some miscreant. I find this surprising, because I've used the Evernote email address myself less than a dozen times! The Evernote note and the incoming email both contain a compressed attachment which is claimed to be an invoice that I'm alleged to have forgotten to pay. Examining the email message's headers, I don't find any text string that refers to my "Evernote" email address. You can bet I've not opened the attachment! In order for this to have occurred, it would seem that the miscreant would have to know both my conversational email address and my Evernote email address and have inserted the latter in the bcc field of the email message. Am I correct on that? That would seem to be WAY too much work for some a**h*le to do with a harvested address book and makes me worry that I've been targeted personally! Comments? One other question: can anyone reading this conceive of a way that I could actually be harmed by this? I do subscribe to the Evernote service "File This" which puts financial statements into my Evernote database. Thanks so much.
  6. Thanks for responding. I still don't understand how context searching works, either in design or in practice. Let's forget for a moment the issues regarding whether it's wise or stupid to add credit card statements or bank statements to one's Evernote database. My question was meant to be about how Evernote (the company) parses my searches of my own database unless the search algorithms have access to the contents of my database. Let me try another example. Let's say I'm a guy who's keeping records of his prescribed medications in Evernote (when the prescriptions are filled, how much they cost, whether they bother me, etc. I see a new doctor and he wants to prescribe a medication for me that I think gave me diarrhea a few years ago. So, I search my "medications" notebook for the medication and try to enhance the search by adding a boolean "or" for my pharmacy. Does Evernote do something to anonymize these search terms? If so, or if not, what search terms would be provided to the "Context" providers? (Actually, I should ask something about the wisdom of storing credit card and bank statements in Evernote. There's a company in the Evernote Marketplace, "File This" whose entire business is based on doing exactly that. All the financial services firms, municipal utilities, etc., with whom I have accounts are constantly peppering me to "go paperless,"which means they want to send statements to me over the internet or provide ssl access to them via the web. Is it inherently more secure to do that than to allow "File This" to insert them into my Evernote database? I must say that I'm quite surprised that my questions haven't engendered more discussion. I'd welcome even one sentence replies, but more nuanced responses would be preferred. I do understand that there's inherently more risk in any online communication than hand delivery of cash to pay my bills (depending on whom I pay, and for what I'm paying), but the option of burying precious metal in my back yard and accumulating stores of gasoline somewhere in the Mountains of Tennessee on the presumption that I'll be able to live off the land and my buried wealth once the great industrial and societal meltdown becomes reality doesn't interest me. I'd last about 3 minutes in an untethered predator vs. prey society, and I expect that except for the few seconds of pain accompanying the attack, I'd be happier not hiding out deep in the woods until discovered. Bottom Line: Evernote is promoted as a great and acceptably secure way to keep one's personal and business data organized, as well as synchronized among devices that store that information. Context Search seems to me a fundamental violation of that promised security. Perhaps there's already somewhere online that Evernote (the company) has described the mechanism of context searching in more detail, but I haven't been able to find it. Let's go back to my original situation (the car collector), but cast it in a realistic situation. Let's say I belong to a brand-specific auto club and participate in their shows, member events, etc. If I search my database with terms designed to find out who shared parts with me for my 1973 BMW 2002 tii at the last Tennessee BMW club meeting and Evernote provides me "context enhanced" hits based on terms like "cars" and "Tennessee" how could that be of use to me? Thanks so much.
  7. I have difficulty understanding how this works. My understanding is that the search for contextually related external information will be done based on my search terms and some processing of what's in my own set of notebooks, but that I need not worry about the privacy of my own information, because none of it is ever sent to external providers of information. I can't understand how my query of my own information can yield enhanced search results UNLESS some of my own information beyond my own search terms is used for this external search. I would be extremely grateful for simple examples of how this works. I'll provide two theoretical examples of my own: first, one where privacy and security of my own perfectly legal and legitimate information is concerned. One of the vendors in the Evernote Marketplace offers to populate my Evernote Database with statements from my financial services providers. Let's say I'm searching all my credit card statements to total all the purchases I've made from two different Rolls Royce dealerships (it would be a very quick search in my case, returning a goose egg). However, let's say I'm a ".00001 per center" who can't remember where I last saw my favorite Silver Wraith, so I'm using context searching to help locate it. Isn't it likely that after all my credit card statements are massaged and some AI applied, that the data retrieved from external sources might permit some of my private information to fall into someone else's hands? Now, another example: let's say I'm managing my cannabis business using Evernote. I decide to search my Evernote database in novel ways to see where I might look for new wholesalers. Same concern. Am I way off base regarding the intent of the context search, it's capabilities, and its risks? Please don't reply "if you're worried, just turn it off." What I'm looking for is an enhanced (believe me, it won't be difficult to enhance it) understanding of just how safe it is to store things in Evernote that, if discovered, might lead to identity theft or fraud, and this "enhanced search" just sounds creepy to me. Talk back to me as if I'm your grandmother who just bought an iPhone Six Plus because the "keypad" numbers on the screen are big Thanks so much
  8. That works, but the interface to maintain pairing and just exactly what happens with and without pairing are far from seamless. Sometimes, when I have a "compatible" app open, pressing the button on the Stylus activates the green LED for just a moment until I release it. Sometimes it continues to blink. I have the sense that in the latter circumstance the pad tracks the position of the stylus better, but I can't be certain. This is not a finished product. I've also discovered that text recognition isn't the same as conversion to editable text. THAT must be the holy grail. I'd be happy if the text recognition created the errors it does but left me with mistakes I could correct on the keyboard when I review my notes later. Is there some way to accomplish that in any of the Jot Script compatible iOS apps? Thanks so much, Jim Robertson
  9. So, nothing new on this in a year! Seems to imply that the problems are business related, not technical. If I go to the Goodnotes website, they still show Evernote integration as "planned", but that was stated by their developers TWO years ago. Any more information available? Thanks, Jim Robertson
  10. I'm having an enormous amount of trouble grasping how the information in my Evernote database can remain private to me if resources outside of my database can offer me "context-sensitive" information based on what I'm adding to my own database. For example, let's say that I work for a certain irreverant publication in Paris, and I'm compiling stuff in my Evernote database about drawings of the prophet over the centuries. Explain to me, if you will, how information on that topic can be offered to me from external sources while I'm in Evernote without someone somewhere having access to the fact that the owner of my database is interested in that information because of what's in my database? I can't begin to fathom how that can happen without some potential for a violation of my privacy.
  11. Thanks for that. I'd found my database by Finder searches in ~/Library/Application Support, then opening every Folder containing "Evernote" until I found one that was quite large. Looks as though the Database isn't composed of one monolithic file, so it shouldn't engorge my Time Machine database with hourly multi-gigabyte backups. Am I correct on that? I was considering excluding the Evernote database from Time Machine backups if it's easy to do so, but my conclusion from poking around in the ~/Library folder is that there's no reason to do so. I'm on Yosemite, fully updated. Thanks so much, Jim Robertson
  12. I've purchsed a Moleskine "smart" notebook, entered some text, photographed the page, and created an Evernote note from the scanned page. My handwriting is not Palmer method pure, but it's not awful. The text recognition engine produces variable results. Note searches find some of the unique words, not others. My question is whether there's any way to edit the results of the search (and, by extension), READ the scanned text in the note in Evernote. The scanning software seems to have a huge problem with numbers. Any fixes for that? Thanks so much, Jim Robertspn
  13. I've made quite a bit of progress in understanding what's going on here. The most likely explanation is that the creator of the pdf used a special glyph of the lower case "b" for all instances of "β". Trying to sort this out, I was impeded but then assisted by my misunderstanding of what the <option-s> keystroke character from the Mac's US keyboard, "ß", really represents. On the ASN Website, it's possible for journal subscribers to view full-text articles as html as well as in pdf format. Remarkably, in the html version at the website the "β" character is not a "styled" lower case "b", but a different character, and either there or in a note brought into Evernote by the EN Web Clipper, it retains its identity as a separate and searchable character. So in the end, I guess this is actually no-one's bug, but a pdf design decision. Now the major question is why the pdf creators chose to do what they did. I don't have much hope that I'll be able to discover that. I think I've been helped (on a few Mac listservs) to an explanation that makes sense and explains seemingly irreconcilable behavior of the "β" character in various circumstances. It turns out that the current Mac OS deprecates the "Symbol" font in favor of encoding characters in what's called "UTF-8." There's an explanation of this on wikipedia that makes my head spin. It appears that UTF-8 gives the 'β' character its own code identifier rather than making it a styled "b". The symbol font on the Mac is available only for what are called "Carbon" apps (those that were basically modified PPC processor code when Macs went from Motorola/IBM PowerPC processors to Intel Processors. There are still some "Carbon" apps available; e.g., MS Office Mac 2008, and Symbol and other .ttf fonts are available to those apps, but "Cocoa" apps require UTF-8 character sets. Jim Robertson
  14. I've made quite a bit of progress in understanding what's going on here. The most likely explanation is that the creator of the pdf used a special glyph of the lower case "b" for all instances of "β". Trying to sort this out, I was impeded but then assisted by my misunderstanding of what the <option-s> keystroke character from the Mac's US keyboard, "ß", really represents. On the ASN Website, it's possible for journal subscribers to view full-text articles as html as well as in pdf format. Remarkably, in the html version at the website the "β" character is not a "styled" lower case "b", but a different character, and either there or in a note brought into Evernote by the EN Web Clipper, it retains its identity as a separate and searchable character. So in the end, I guess this is actually no-one's bug, but a pdf design decision. Now the major question is why the pdf creators chose to do what they did. I don't have much hope that I'll be able to discover that.
  15. I've wasted spent the morning further investigating this. I thought I might have a solution to titling my notes with the "beta" character—just choose the beta character using the Apple Keyboard viewer. Only problem with that was that what looks like the Greek "beta" character on the Mac keyboard viewer is in fact the German "sharp s" as in street, Strasse, a character apparently not used much in modern German. So once I entered that character in the search field in pdfs, I can find all instances of "ss". Not very useful. And, if I use a Greek keyboard layout on my Mac to enter the Greek lower case b (or beta) character into the "find" field of a pdf or Evernote containing a pdf, I'm told there are no occurrences of the character in the document. So, there seems to be a fundamental difference between how the Mac and Win OS deal with at least some foreign language characters. My knowledge of fonts is exhausted by that speculation. Anyone have any explanation? Thanks so much, Jim Robertson
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