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GHall

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  1. I just opened a support ticket. Funny thing, this is the first time I've ever had an issue with Evernote; yet, my level of trust has dropped. I bought into the idea of remembering everything. How can I do that if I cannot trust that the information will be there? One thing that has bothered me during the past year or so is the huge influx of new features. EN is getting bloated.
  2. Recently, I had a local notebook sync some new notes to the Evernote cloud, creating that supposedly "local" notebook in the online version of Evernote. I'm Premium by the way. So when I deleted the online version of the "local" notebook, the "local" version of that notebook deleted and all my notes synced to the Evernote cloud. I lost 15 notes in this process. I mainly use Evernote as a repository for all my files. Luckily, I've kept all the same files in folders on my hard drive for the past three years. Recently, I planned to delete them, since I use Evernote exclusively. I think I might scrap Evernote instead. This one little issue has caused me about 6 hours of hassle with about another 6 hours to undo this.
  3. I just purchased an Apple Thunderbolt to VGA dongle and connected the flat panel LCD from a windows tower that we no longer use. I can hardly believe that I've gone without this extra screen space. I now have files open on one LCD for viewing and the other LCD on the MacBook for entering data. The dongle is $29, so if anyone has an extra monitor around the house like I did, give this a try. Not to mention, Apple will take the dongle back no questions asked for 14 days.
  4. While I do not own an iPad (though I would enjoy having one and after reading about various uses am considering), I do like what I've read about Penultimate. This Webpage describes integration with Evernote which might meet your expectations. http://willkelly.org/2012/01/22/penultimate-evernote-finally-together/
  5. I checked this out. After looking more closely at services and price structure, seems like the cost adds up quickly.
  6. PDF/A format would be helpful for someone working on a PhD for example, who might be scanning original source material. That material would then be available for decades to come. Page 42 of the book in this topic talks about data that goes missing in Webpages for example. PDF/A does not allow this kind of thing to happen. This is interesting stuff.
  7. No. Laziness more than anything. If I remember correctly, PDF/A makes it read-only, so I cannot add bookmarks, annotations, etc. later without saving a separate copy. No big deal, but I haven't seen it to be worth the hassle. Actually, bookmarks are permitted. So is OCR and accessibility for persons with sensory issues. Security features are not. Also, can not utilize transparency or PDF layers, so watermarks can not be used for example. For persons using TWAIN compliant scanners, Acrobat 9 Pro allows for scanning directly to PDF/A. This does not help me with my ScanSnap S1500M. But there are several other easy ways to make PDF's into PDF/A using Acrobat 9 Pro or some other software titles. A drawback to using PDF/A is file size. There is some overhead for the embedding of fonts, etc. My understanding was that you cannot add bookmarks AFTER you save as PDF/A. The same for annotations and so forth. It's read only, right? It's not a big deal, but it is an extra hassle (if I am right). If you can add bookmarks and stuff afterwards (I haven't use the PDF/A file type for a long time, so I don't remember well) then it might be time for me to make a switch. Bookmarks can be added. They can be added because security features that limit or control the file are not allowed. This is to ensure that the file use is not limited by those type of features. I wish that my ScanSnap S1500M had the ability to scan directly to PDF/A.
  8. No. Laziness more than anything. If I remember correctly, PDF/A makes it read-only, so I cannot add bookmarks, annotations, etc. later without saving a separate copy. No big deal, but I haven't seen it to be worth the hassle. Actually, bookmarks are permitted. So is OCR and accessibility for persons with sensory issues. Security features are not. Also, can not utilize transparency or PDF layers, so watermarks can not be used for example. For persons using TWAIN compliant scanners, Acrobat 9 Pro allows for scanning directly to PDF/A. This does not help me with my ScanSnap S1500M. But there are several other easy ways to make PDF's into PDF/A using Acrobat 9 Pro or some other software titles. A drawback to using PDF/A is file size. There is some overhead for the embedding of fonts, etc.
  9. With going paperless and reading many wonderful use cases for Evernote, I've also stumbled upon many different projects people are engaged in. One that interests me greatly is scanning books to PDF format. I have 600+ books that could be converted to PDF format to make the storage area needed for them smaller and to increase portability. A side note: the portability factor is probably the biggest driving factor to complete a book conversion project like this. Reading about the use of iPad from users such as GrumpyMonkey in these forums has spurned interest in possibly acquiring my own iPad. At the very least I want to be sure as much of my content is ready to be viewed on an iPad, so that I do not have to deal with the conversion of documents when I finally make the leap.Converting so many books of course is a huge undertaking and perhaps would be considered not very worthwhile by some. I like to tinker. So, this sort of project in my spare time seems fun. I enjoy learning new things. As a result I've delved deeper into the PDF standard and found PDF/A. There are many areas of law and commerce that require long term reliable storage of data, so the PDF/A standard was developed. PDF/A has become the standard for submitting legal documentation to courts. Essentially PDF/A limits the scope of useable PDF features and requires they be embedded into the file, so all the data needed to view the PDF is contained within it. For example links to fonts is prohibited. This prevents the possibility that a particular font be absent from a particular computer (either now or future), so that when the font link is invoked, the formatting of the file becomes altered. This doesn't happen with PDF/A. Instead the PDF/A file uses fonts within the file so formatting does not get altered. Some of the documents that get scanned into Evernote, such as utility bills, do not typically need to last decades. Perhaps having acces to them for up to seven years will suffice, since that would take care of tax needs in the US for example. In those cases PDF/A would not be needed. But what about keepsakes, such as scanned projects from your kids' early years or your family genealogy research? Perhaps you want to pass them to your future generations? PDF/A seems to be the way to store information for the long-term. Getting back to scanning my book collection, I've been thinking that since it's so labor intensive, that I would want to take the time to be sure it's done as good as I can get from the beginning. For all interested parties, here is a link to the book PDF/A in a Nutshell: Long-Term Archiving with PDF, which is put out by the PDF/A Competence Center of the PDF Association. http://www.pdfa.org/...-in-a-nutshell/ It contains background information into PDF, compares Microsoft's XPS format with PDF, describes the various levels of PDF/A and shows specifically how to convert or create PDF/A documents. Many screenshots abound. Adobe Acrobat 8 Pro is used (version 9 is similar) along with a few products from other vendors. Do you use PDF/A?
  10. I found these and thought others would find them useful. http://tv.adobe.com/watch/learn-acrobat-9/introducing-acrobat-9-pro/
  11. Nice thread. Informative. Any specific tips for scanning paper books and then formatting PDF's to make them most readable?
  12. I am surprised and then again am not. Since I haven't purchased ebooks and haven't really been into them, I had no idea.
  13. idoc, I agree with you here. And I'm happy you've found something that works for you. The great thing about these systems that we each create or adopt (a little of both probably) or change things up as the need arises. One of the reasons that I've adopted the strategy of one file to one note and labeling with a uniform style of file/note naming is that my brain thinks better in terms of naming the thing than describing its location. I could always remember what I wanted to find but just couldn't remember where I put it. Since all my PDF's are OCR'd prior to EN and named intelligently to the way I think, then I'm able to rely on searching rather than knowing where it is to be found (in the more specific directory/folder sense of location). Because of course I know that it's in my second brain - Evernote.
  14. I think it is pretty clear that you have a lot of control over your data (I am not sure what "full" means). Practically speaking, you can export your content anytime. The master copy (so-to-speak) of your data is held in your computer and is completely under your control. And, you can access your data from just about any computer platform. If Evernote's servers are captured in a midnight raid by ninjas dressed in Disney character outfits, you'll have everything safe and sound at home. The concern here is that those ninjas could access your data because it isn't encrypted on the servers. This is a separate issue (in my mind) from having "control". In the context of this discussion, I would like to see finer grain control: the ability to "wall off" certain notebooks in your account from third party apps if you choose to give them access to your account, the ability to encrypt notebooks, the ability to lock notes, etc., but this is so far beyond what anyone else offers that I think it is reasonable to expect such features to take time to implement, if they are implemented at all. This is a new frontier. As far as the privacy policy, I think it is pretty clear. Your public information will be shared under certain circumstances, and your Evernote data will be shared (probably with government entities) if there is a legal obligation to do so ( Unfortunately, within the surveillance state that the US has become -- this is where Evernote's servers are located -- the government now has its hands in everything, and there is nothing Evernote can do about this, so if you are doing something that you don't want the government to see, then you should encrypt it yourself). I think the privacy policy is consistent with others I have seen. http://www.evernote.com/about/privacy/ This discussion has gotten so serious. Funny thing is I use Evernote in part because I believe in the CEO's approach. 100 year company? Who does this? Evernote. Cool. Now, where are those ninja dressed in Disney character outfits? I want to see this. I guess the only thing that I would hope should these ninja steel Evernote servers is that Evernote have the darn ninja on video and have gps tracking devices on the servers. This way we have video footage for the navy seals to plan a counter attack and some gps beacons blipping so they know where to start looking. Now back to more seriousness, it's reasonable to expect Evernote to keep stuff private, perhaps not certainly private, though we should expect reasonably private. Phil Libin provides us with a reasonable statement of what we can expect in "Three Laws of Data Protection". And this is especially important in that Evernote wants to be the extension of all of our brains.
  15. Okay. I'll post something here. The Evernote idea is about extending your brain. I decide when and to whom to share stuff in my brain. If Evernote is really about extending my brain, then I should have full control over the content in Evernote forever. Phil Libin has committed Evernote to be a 100 year company and said that he envisioned working at Evernote for the rest of his life, according to statements he made in an interview at Stanford University which can be heard through Entrepreneurial Thought Leaders series entitled "No Exit Strategy for Your Life's Work - Phil Libin (Evernote)" dated 10/12/2011. Description in image below. I think if Phil Libin can make the 100 year company commitment, he can make the your data is yours forever commitment too. Evernote's "Three Laws of Data Protection" posted by Phil Libin on March 24, 2011, is this kind of commitment. Now, is this language also in the Evernote privacy policy? I'm going to read it.
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