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kimaldis

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  1. sure, and that's how tags should be. There's the problem, though, they've shoe-horned a partially hierarchical system into tags when really notebooks are more suited. So they have a half hierarchical notebook system - only two levels - and a half-hierarchical tag system, neither of which provide much of why anyone would need a tree structure for thier notes. It's like nearly everything in Evernote; done in the most unhelpful possible way.
  2. tags have to be uniquely named. So I can't have 2 nodes both with, say, a notes tag undereneath. Why wouldn't I want to have identically named nodes in several places in my note structure? I know there are naming workarounds but they're just that, workarounds. It's kludgy and I don't want to have to deal with it. consider this structure: aaa bbb ccc If I select tag 'aaa'in the sidebar it only shows notes contained in 'aaa'. It should show notes in the child tags The full path of any given tag doesn't show in the note header. This doesn't seem like a problem now but it is if non-unique tag names are allowed. Why can't I create and rearrange notebooks and tags by D&D in the sidebar. Who would anyone miss that out?
  3. HIerarchical tags are poorly implimented, half baked.
  4. It's free for personal use. I'm using it with no Salesforce account. It works fine for single users. It offers more of what I need than Evernote does and they seem to have a better understanding of end users' needs than Evernote does. Evernote isshowing it's age and there's no sign that anyone treats that seriously.
  5. I've just checked Quip out. It kind of leaves Evernote in the shade, doesn't it. I'm still messing with it but right now I see no reason not to make a move over to it.
  6. It is a bit mad that you can't move notebooks around between stacks in the sidebar. Same goes for renaming. And for adding new stacks, come to that. It just seems the obvious place to do it.
  7. Project A contains a notes section and and a members section. Storing and showing them as a tree is more representetive of the model I have in my head. Tags are labels, they can be applied to many things. They can be stored as a hierarchy but that hierarchy isn't a representation of the data, it's a representation of labels. I think this is also where EN hae come a bit unstuck in the past, when they'e suggested you use labels to organise notes. Tags are useful but I don't think primary organisation of the data is best use. Yes, I understand how to use naming conventions to work around deficiencies in the design but my experience tells me naming conventions should be a last resort. Better design would render it un-necessary. It's functional, but messy.
  8. It's semantics, really. Given a choice I'd choose hierarchical notebooks over hierarchical tags, probably. I've done a lot of work with hierarchies over the years, both as a user and as a developer; by definition a tree structure allows for non-unique node names because a node is not global, it occupies its own space and that's one of the big plusses of a tree. A structure like below is not uncommon but messy in Evernote: Project A Notes members Project B Noters Members My real beef is that they're trying to make it do something that it's not. I think what you're talking about is arranging a flat tag list into a hiearchy. If that's the case then, again, it's not a hierarchical tag structure, it's a hierarchical view of a flat tag structure, which is a confusion. But like I said, semantics, I'd be happy with true nested notebooks, though; Evernote desperately needs some kind of hierarchical structure.
  9. It really isn't really hierarchical. If it was you'd be able to have identically named tags in different parts of the tree. You'd also be able to specify tags with a full path and select a full tag branch. You can do none of these things. Tags in Evernote appear to be no more than the same visual decoration that notebooks stacks are. If you want to see it done properly, take a look at Bear.
  10. Threre's always a reason... Half-baked is a recurring thing in Evernote becuase forward thinking design hasn't ever been a thing with it. You can see how it probably happened; you design a fairly simple data structure then, as time goes by and needs expand, your lack of forthought restricts your ability to adapt to new needs so you hack in anything you can to paper over the cracks, make it look better without actually addressing the things that prompted the feature request in the first place. So you get nested tags that aren't really hierarchical so have none of the advantages of a hierarchical structure, likewise with notebook stacks. It's madness that an app the basic purpose of which is to let you organise your data uses a flat data structure and doesn't have even the most basic tools for organising data. It can only get worse.
  11. OK, here's my take on this: * System prefs, shortcuts to assign shortcuts to font size (4 - 14,18,24,36) and font (1, Arial) - thanks @DTLow for that, I assumed it only applied to top menubar items * BetterTouchtool to put buttons in the touch bar for Headings 1,2,3 and normal which calll applescripts when pressed. Heading scripts select the line then send shortcut keystrokes to apply font and size to the line from the menu. Normal selects the paragraph rather than a line. Better touch tool and the touch bar because I can't be. bothered to remember the shortcuts, which can be obscure because looking for ones that aren't taken. ( I used <ctrl>1,2,3,4,5 ) tell application "System Events" key code 123 using {command down} key code 124 using {command down, shift down} keystroke "1" using {control down} -- H1 (36) delay 0.1 keystroke "5" using {control down} -- Arial end tell tell application "System Events" key code 126 using {option down} -- paragraph select key code 125 using {option down, shift down} keystroke "4" using {control down} -- size 14 delay 0.1 keystroke "5" using {control down} - Arial end tell I've struggled for ever to get something close to OneNote's rather slick text formatting workflow and, for me, this is about as good as it needs to be. I can literally place the cursor, hit a key and the line or paragraph is transformed instantly The advantage of BetterTouchTool wrapping it is a) no shortcut to remember and b) you get to combine both font and font size changes in one hit. If you don't have a tuch bar, assign the scripts to key presses or sequences. I didn't really do much, it's just a gathering of what's gone before here, so thanks to those that went before. Next battle, proper tag hierarchies and infinite notebook nesting depth. Forward!!
  12. It looks like this was a one-off on a particular note. Trying it on a new note and I don't get the same problem. I was using Evertool to format the note, this may have had something to do with it.
  13. Chipping in with a couple of thoughts: Headings are huge for me.The ability to simply grab a heading level instead of digging around in menus have implications for both speed and constency of style across notes and notebooks. Lack of this and the generally awful formatting workflow has been the almost sole reason why I've not stuck with Evernote in the past. Thoughts: Hotkeys or shortcuts would be a good thing Custom styles in the dropdown, with shortcuts, obviously. I like the new layout, much easier to see how my documents are structured. I know it's been discussed to death but I really don't understand the resistance to mulitply nested notebooks. It hurts no-one to have them, if you don't like them dont' use them. Surely?
  14. This is true of other formatted text but code blocks serve as an example. When I insert a code block at the end of a note I can't find an obvious way to add unformatted text after it. Try this: 1. New Note 2. In the note body type ``` followed by a return to get a code block and add some text to it 3. Now, try and add some plain text after the code block. I'm stuck, any thoughts? thanks.
  15. Late reply. Sorry. The way I see it, I shouldn't have to worry about what will and what won't. I don't think it's unreasonable to expect that it just works. The inconsistency in the way content is pasted into Evernote is off the chart. It's doubly frustrating when it's so hard to fix because Evernote's formatting tools are so kludgy. If it was even productive to author in another app then paste into Evernote that would be something but it's not because you never know what you're going to get. It's a mess.
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