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Hackademic

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  1. For those who prefer to write in Markdown, but want the HTML to reside in Evernote, the Markdown2Evernote service by Brett Terpstra and Martin Kopischke is great. I've also updated it to add wiki functionality. If your interested, my most recent blog post discusses my update, has a download of my version, and links to Martin's most up-to-date version as well: http://bit.ly/17eSfGg
  2. If you were interested in writing in Markdown or MultiMarkdown, but want the HTML to reside in Evernote, the Markdown2Evernote service by Brett Terpstra and Martin Kopischke is great. I've also updated it to add wiki functionality. If your interested, my most recent blog post discusses my update, has a download of my version, and links to Martin's most up-to-date version as well: http://bit.ly/17eSfGg
  3. For those who prefer to write in Markdown, but want the HTML to reside in Evernote, the Markdown2Evernote service by Brett Terpstra and Martin Kopischke is great. I've also updated it to add wiki functionality. If your interested, my most recent blog post discusses my update, has a download of my version, and links to Martin's most up-to-date version as well: http://bit.ly/17eSfGg
  4. Adam, I'm so sorry for the long delay. Your post sparked a total reevaluation of the scripts. I had actually stopped using them, but your post reminded me that they were worth making functional. Your particular issue stems from my original scripts being written to work only with the paid version of TextMate. That was foolish and selfish of me. I agree that these are awesome features so I've totally retooled these functions to work with the Markdown2Evernote Mac OS X Service. For this workflow, you write in Markdown syntax in an external editor and then send that Markdown text to Evernote as a HTML note. I've bundled the autolinking to pre-existing notes and to new notes functions into this service. It is now application agnostic, much faster, and much easier. For a fuller description and a download of the service, see my blog post here: http://bit.ly/17eSfGg
  5. BIG UPDATE: I've totally retooled these functions to work with the Markdown2Evernote Mac OS X Service. For this workflow, you write in Markdown syntax in an external editor and then send that Markdown text to Evernote as a HTML note. I've bundled the autolinking to pre-existing notes and to new notes functions into this service. It is now application agnostic, much faster, and much easier. For a fuller description and a download of the service, see my blog post here: http://bit.ly/17eSfGg
  6. One possible solution is to use Evernote housed template notes or (my own method) to use a TextExpander template. Because TextExpander (or aText) allow for rich text, you can create a well formatted outline template and assign it a shortcut like ",,outline". On your Mac, all you need to do is open up a new note and type ",,outline". Then you fill in as needed and delete as needed. Its not perfect, and writing in Markdown is my own solution, but it might be helpful. stephenhttp://hackademic.postach.io/
  7. fflav, I'm a graduate student in Classical Studies. I use Evernote alot and think a project like this is very important. College students need at least a baseline to start thinking about how to leverage their computers and their applications. I've developed (and am developing, as is always the case) a fairly complex workflow in which Evernote plays a large role. I've been detailing the specifics on a blog I've recently started (the platform is actually grounded on Evernote). Instead of going too indepth (that would take forever), I'll point you there. But, in basic form, I use Evernote to "host" all of my notes. This includes class-notes, notes on primary sources for class, and notes on secondary sources for research. I have a number of AppleScripts to automate various parts of my workflow, but in the end everything is written in plain text and formatted in Markdown. I then send that text to Evernote as HTML. At the heart of my workflow are Hyperlinks. I use my own custom URL for PDFs, I use Evernote's custom URLs, as well as other apps url schemes to embed links to nearly all of the data on my computer. The result is that Evernote is the place where all of my "clickable" links reside, inside of notes. The idea is to create a Personal Wiki on my desktop that glues together all of my primary apps and data. If anyone is interested in more of the specifics, shoot me a message and check out my new blog. Looking forward to reading this ebook, stephenhttp://hackademic.postach.io/
  8. Greg, Your post was a great aid to me this last semester, so I wanted to pass on my thanks. You also helped to start me down the path to figuring out more ways to utilize Evernote in my academic interests. I've actually now started using Evernote almost as a web server to host HTML notes with my own custom hyperlinks to PDFs and other Evernote notes embedded. Its a bit confusing in short form, but inspired by your helpful tutorial, I've starting blogging about what I do and (more importantly) how I do it. But here, I just wanted to say thanks for helping me to discover so many uses for Evernote, stephenhttp://hackademic.postach.io/
  9. I, like Grumpy Monkey, take my notes in the PDF viewer/annotator on mobile platforms. I use a Mac, and I have written some scripts that export my annotations to text files formatted in Markdown with custom URLs back to the original PDF. I then send that Markdown plain text to Evernote as HTML, where all of my hyperlinks become "clickable." This has really helped my actual note taking (all in one place, in the PDF viewer itself) as well as my reviewing (I can easily get back to the original PDF). I've started discussing my methods and putting up my scripts on a new blogging platform that actually uses Evernote as its backbone. If you're on a Mac, some of the things there might be helpful (it's easier for me to refer you than to re-post my thoughts or scripts, which can be a bit long; as Grumpy Monkey knows, having seen a few of them himself). Hope that might help you, stephenhttp://hackademic.postach.io/
  10. I recently realized that I could utilize TextExpander to simplify this process. Instead of launching the app with a Selection Window with the 4 programs that I might want to embed links from, and then have a Dialog Box that allows me to choose between getting the link of whatever item is currently selected or choosing any item on my own, I have created 8 different snippets that launch the sub-structures of the script. If you have TextExpander (or what I use aText, which has all the same features but is newer and cheaper), then this set-up I find to be simpler and faster.
  11. Chad, Happy to help. Not too long ago I was the new guy and spent too much time scouring the forums and the Internet at large to find what I needed, so I know the feeling. I have actually created a sort-of suite of apps and scripts to create various wiki functionalities in Evernote. I would love to send you exactly what you would like best, so could you describe your best use-case? In general though, you need to get the Markdown2Evernote script, which I discuss in an earlier post on this thread. Go to Tim Lockridge's blog (linked in that earlier post) to find a step by step set of instructions. His post is specifically for the text editor TextMate. I would recommend it, but its not necessary. You can also use the Mac's built in TextEditor. If you choose the latter route, you will need to tweak both Tim's instructions (make the script an Automator service) and my script (using TextEditor instead of TextMate). If this is confusing, just outline your ideal situation to use create this functionality, and I'll work to break it down step-by-step for you.
  12. Update: I have trouble-shooted my scripts and combined them to give Mac users a one-stop shop way to turn Evernote into a Wiki. Check out my other posts for more specific info, as well as the preamble to the script. But essentially this Applescript will allow you to generate links to pre-existing notes that have the "Wiki" tag and to generate new notes if you type WikiWords or [[term]] into your note. It uses the Evernote Mac client, TextMate, and the Markdown2Evernote command for TextMate. Other than that, its all script. I've been using it for a week or so now, debugging along the way, and it works well for me. I've attached the most recent script below as a .txt file. Simply open, copy and paste into the Applescript Editor. Wikify Combined v.3.txt
  13. Sorry for multiple posts, but I actually debugged once more. I realized that the scripts were unable to handle input that didn't have links to pre-existing notes and WikiWords. So I wrote in large, wrapping if blocks for the two major halves of the script so that even if you the note doesn't have links to pre-existing notes and/or it doesn't have WikiWords or [[bracketed words]], the script will still function. For example, if you were to run this new script (Version 1.3 of the new combined scripts) on a note with the text: "This note has nothing in it." The script would hastily export a note from TextMate to Evernote with that exact content, but now with the tag "Wiki". This is the last major potential bug I could think of, but if you find any, please let me know and I will see what I can do. Likewise, I have attempted to explain in detail how the script works with extensive commenting, so you may be able to fix it yourself. Either way, please use and post your results. New .txt file below. Wikify Combined v.3.txt
  14. I am happy to say that I have successfully united my two scripts. You may now assign this script to an Automator Service that it contextually linked to Evernote, assign it a unique hotkey, and voila! you can efficiently Wikify your Evernote. Essentially, this new script searches your Evernote for pre-existing notes with the "Wiki" tag and places ((double parentheses)) around any terms or phrases in your text that match any of those notes. It get gathers the note link info, puts them into Markdown format, and finds and replaces the ((para)) terms with Markdown [title](link) terms. It then (tho not in exactly this order) searches for any WikiWords in the text. Any such words are [[double bracketed]] (thus, you may also put [[double brackets]] around a non-WikiWord term to create a new note). It then creates a new notebook with the original notes title, and creates new notes within that notebook with the titles of the WikiWords or [[bracketed terms]]. It get grabs the note link info for these new notes and puts the info in Markdown format. One more find and replace to get the [[bracketed]] terms out and the new [title](link) terms in. Finally, the script exports the text to TextMate, with the appropriate Metadata (title, notebook, tags) and automatically imports it back into Evernote using the Markdown2Evernote command for TextMate. After all this, the script also deletes the old note. A few usage notes: In order to run smoothly, the search for pre-existing notes is limited to notes with the "Wiki" tag. Thus, if you want a note to be 'visible' to the script, you must assign it this tag. Moreover, once your number of Wiki notes grows, this may not be efficient enough anymore. I would add a new tag to your original note and add this into the script as a variable. Also, while you can put non-WikiWord terms into [[double brackets]] in the original note to create new notes, this will create two notes ("double" and "brackets"). I am doing extensive testing now to find any other bugs. Would appreciate any help on that front. I have attached a .txt file with the script below. Wikify Combined.txt
  15. I should explain further. This does not turn a regular note into Markdown. It allows a user to type up a note, say on their smartphone, using the Markdown syntax and to then convert that note to HTML and put it back in Evernote later, replacing the original. As promised, here is a list of what elements of Markdown Evernote translates properly. There are only two that Evernote doesn't translate: [1] # Header -> for whatever reason, Evernote deletes everything following a single # [2] Reference Links: [title][id] with later [id]: Otherwise, Evernote translates all of these syntaxes when using Markdown2Evernote:Supported:[1] *italics*[2] **bold**[3] ordered list[4] unordered list[5] ## second level header[6] ### third level header[7] `inline code`[8] > quote[9] [title](URL)[10] <URL>[11] --- Horizontal Rule
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