Jump to content

nardhelain

Level 2
  • Content Count

    13
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

12 Neutral

About nardhelain

  1. The main reason for me using Evernote Web is because the desktop client for Windows is buggy! So I am forced to use the web client for my daily Evernote work. I would be quite happy to use the desktop client solely only if it was bug-free. Unfortunately, Evernote does not have a very good track record of producing bug-free software. I've lost count the number of times I've had to send support requests to them reporting problematic glitches in the software. So the only thing keeping me going is the solid robust version of Evernote Web. And to be honest, I like the fact that it is the same setup as the the desktop clients. This means it is easier to learn and use should anyone need to use it when the desktop client is unavailable. If Evernote are truly going on this road of having a different layout on desktop clients and a totally different layout on the web. Then I can forsee many users becoming confused and this will require more learning time. Also many tips and tricks one uses in the desktop client will no longer be possible in the web version due to a different user interface. So to me this doesn't make sense to have different layouts. In my opinion (I maybe wrong), but I think Evernote might eventually abandon the desktop clients altogether and just focus on having a web version. The only problem with this would be the difficulty in backing up certain notebooks for private use or downloading notebooks/notes locally onto the PC. The other option, of course maybe would be to congruous all the software so that it works and behaves similarly. They tried that last bit already - to make the web client mirror the desktop clients. There's too much functionality that doesn't transfer, or at least doesn't transfer well. In-client image and pdf annotation come to mind, not to mention the ability to arrange tags and stacks to one's preference. A distraction-free note editor is a great idea, but I wonder if the web client is the right place for it. In my use case, the only time I use the web interface is if I'm looking for something. If I need to compose, I'll use the Windows client or the iOS client. I'd much rather have a spiffy search interface be the default screen on the web than this still-clunky white space affair.
  2. I received a reply to a tweet that relieves my mind a little: Initial tweet: @evernote Where are the Reminders in the beta web client? Couldn't find them anywhere, and that is terrible! Response: Currently not enabled but will be supported and will roll out in subsequent beta releases. (from @evernotehelps)
  3. I couldn't find them either, bulldzr. I even made a new note with a reminder in the old interface, switched, and went looking for the reminder in the new interface, and there's no trace of any reminder functionality. If Evernote is going to start valuing a pretty interface over useful functionality, I just don't know how I can continue using the service.
  4. Even worse, there's no way that I was able to find to even set a reminder on a note, never mind view reminders that already exist. It looks to me like the Reminders feature is going away entirely, which is terrible! That was one of the best feature upgrades Evernote came out with; really allows the platform to be used for productive work instead of just as a digital filing cabinet.
  5. The pdf issue is a problem, also bulleted lists don't display correctly. Sub-bullets are kicked out to regular bullets.
  6. Hi folks. For any interested parties, I've updated my suite of Captain's Log IFTTT recipes (about which I originally posted here). It's auto-journaling for the lazy and/or forgetful journaler, with some nice features for the more dedicated journaler, as well. Changes: Shifted the daily log note creation recipe from fetching the weather forecast to a simple time-triggered text note creation. My fetch-the-weather log creation recipe has been unreliable of late for unknown reasons, so I made this change in hopes of avoiding this problem. I left both recipes intact on my profile so the user may choose whichever they preferAdded an append-the-weather-forecast recipe for those who use the time-triggered log creation recipe. If the weather forecast exists to be fetched, it can still be included in the Captain's Log.Added a recipe that will append Google Calendar events as tasks to the Captain's log. This recipe is a workaround for the spottily-reliable iOS Reminders IFTTT hook, and it works best if you maintain some or all of your regular tasks as calendar events. For example, I have a dedicated "to-do" calendar in my Google account where I keep things like my weekly "take out the trash" reminder. This recipe will add scheduled events from this calendar to the Captain's Log with a checkbox to tick when the task is done. Unlike the iOS Reminders recipe, this version has the added benefit of being cross-platform. Again, I left both recipes intact so that the user can choose their favorite.Enjoy.
  7. I rarely ever use Siri for anything, mostly because I think I look ridiculous arguing with my phone, but I'll hazard a guess that anything not specifically coded into that system is going to default to a web search. If Siri will allow you to add or append to a note in Evernote, then the Captain's Log should be no different. However, if such functionality isn't baked in, then I don't expect Siri to know what to do with it.
  8. Sure! Forgive the lack of visual aids here, but I'll explain it out as best I can. Start by opening Drafts on your device, and tap the "share" button (the little square with the arrow coming out of it). From there, tap the gear to open your settings panel. Scroll down to the "Custom Actions" section. You'll see there options to work with Email, Message, Dropbox, Evernote, and URL Actions, in addition to a link to the Drafts Action Directory. The Directory is a website maintained by Drafts' developer that will allow you to install some fairly specialized actions into your list. For example, I like the one that lets me take my Drafts text and search for it on Goodreads. But for now, have a look at the "Evernote Actions" panel, which is probably blank if you've not played with it before. Tap the little + in the upper right corner. I'll walk you through the example of creating an action to append your Draft to a Captain's Log note. In the "Name" field, enter some descriptive title for your action. e.g. Add to captain's log In the "Title" field, enter the title of the note which you want to modify. The default starting value in this field is [[time]], which creates or modifies a note in your Evernote account with Drafts' timestamp as its title. For my captain's log example, the title of the note I wished to modify was fixed, so I entered Captain's Log in the "Title" field. If you are in the habit of making the first line of your Draft something that would be appropriate as a note title, you can use [[title]] here to have the app always pull the first line of text for your EN note title. (Note the "Tag Help" button at the bottom of the panel - there's a reference of coded elements you can use in your actions.) The "Notebook" field is pretty self-explanatory; here you tell Drafts which EN notebook you want to host your text. Leave it blank to use your default notebook. The "Tags" field is also self-explanatory. The "Write" selector tells Drafts what you want to do with the contents of your Draft. You can "Create" a new note, "Prepend" or stick your text at the beginning of an existing note, or "Append" or stick your text at the end of an existing note. For my captain's log, I selected "Append" to send my text to the end of an already-existing log. If you don't write your text in Markdown format, leave the Markdown HTML switch alone. If you do use Markdown when you write, Drafts will compile it before sending the text to Evernote if you enable this option. The "Template" field is where you format the content you send to Evernote. In my log example, the template is structured as follows: [[draft]] [[time]] - - - - - This sends the entire contents of my Draft to my captain's log, puts a timestamp on it, and provides a divider of dashes to separate my current text from whatever next lands in my log. Another useful element is [[body]], which sends the contents of your Draft minus the first line (which you might have used earlier as the note title and would therefore not need to duplicate). Tap "Save" in the upper right corner when you're done, and Drafts adds your newly crafted action to your list. I believe it defaults to putting your action on the first page, but it's easy enough to move around after if you so choose. And that's it! I have custom Evernote actions that post to postach.io, that add my Draft to a "Writing" notebook, that add my Draft to a "Shopping Lists" notebook, and the like. You can even have Drafts tell Evernote that you'd like to put a reminder on the text you're sending over. This requires an Email action (not an Evernote action), and you'll have to manually set the date and time afterwards. It's a decent workaround, though. I hope this helps introduce you to custom actions - they're among the best features of Drafts!
  9. Hi MrTR909, I've been playing around with journaling options and methods that tie in to Evernote. I tried DayOne, and I really like its interface, but I'm not a habitual daily journaler. I keep forgetting to record stuff in the moment, and writing things down days later just jumbles the chronology. So, I cobbled together a partially automated solution that lets me add information to a daily "captain's log" from a variety of sources. The original inspiration for this method came from here. There's a bit of a time and effort (and a little cash) investment up front, but once you have the system in place, it practically runs itself. For this particular solution to work, you will need the following: An iOS deviceAn Evernote accountAn IFTTT accountAn iCloud accountIFTTT app (on your iOS device)Drafts by AgileTortoise (for your iOS device), optionalHere's how you set it up: Make a new notebook in your Evernote account in which you will store your Captain's Logs. Decide on a base title for your daily log notes. For example, I keep mine in a notebook called Personal Logs, and the note title starts out as simply "Captain's Log." Set up these recipes in your IFTTT account. Note that the iOS Reminders recipe can't be set up in your browser; you'll have to do it from your iDevice. I have IFTTT set to pull content from Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Foursquare, Reminders, and the daily weather forecast. You can easily remove recipes that aren't relevant for you and add others to record your typical daily content. ​Very Important: In all your Captain's Log recipes, make sure the destination notebook and note title are identical (case sensitive, punctuation, etc.) This is to make sure that your information is all appended to the same note. I have my daily log set to be generated by importing the day's weather forecast at the same time every morning. This import always creates a new note, rather than appending to an existing log. If you choose not to add the weather forecast to your log, I recommend choosing something that IFTTT can go and fetch at the same time every day. However, if you prefer a single log note that goes on forever, omit this note creation step and simply append to your existing log. For content that I add to my Log independent of the services I have hooked into IFTTT, I typically generate the text in Drafts on my phone or tablet. Drafts lets me then push that text out to a number of destinations, including blogs, Evernote, and others. I added an Evernote action to Drafts that appends the Draft content to my Captain's Log for random thoughts, blog posts, and the like. If you do not use a centralized text editor like Drafts, it would be just as easy to plug your blog or Tumblr into IFTTT and pull your posts in that way, Should you wish to add an entry to your Log without going through any of your connected services, you can always edit the Log directly in the Evernote client, which is available on any platform.There is one critical log maintenance operation that I haven't yet figured out how to automate. If you prefer a daily log note as opposed to single log that goes on forever, you will have to go into Evernote at the end of every day (or early the next morning) and manually change your log note title so that the next day's items are appended to a new log. For example, I change "Captain's Log" to "Captain's Log, 12/22/13". Finally, remember that the sky's the limit with IFTTT. You can plug in your Google Calendar to record events that you attend, your UP fitness tracker to add your physical activity or food log, your iOS contacts so you can remember when you met recent business contacts, archive your sent email messages, etc., etc. One more tip: Leave IFTTT running in the background on your iOS device when you're ticking off completed tasks. The Reminders app tie-in won't flag IFTTT with new completed tasks until the iOS app updates, which it doesn't do very often if it isn't actually running. I hope this helps.
  10. I tried out EATags, which seems to work like a charm. You can find them here: https://eatags.com/
  11. I discovered Zendone yesterday. I started out thinking that I'd just try it out as I'm simultaneously reading Allen's GTD. There's no iPad app yet (boo), so I didn't really want to pay for premium subs for both EN and Zendone, but the more I fiddle with it, the more I think it might be worth supporting the team working on it. The only real wrinkle is the inability to bidirectionally support recurring events in google calendar. Everything else is just gorgeous and works beautifully.
×
×
  • Create New...