Jump to content

therearenoroadshere

Level 2
  • Content Count

    11
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

1 Neutral

About therearenoroadshere

  1. Good points all around. I did not want to give the impression of attempting to subvert the security or filtering protocol for my employer;on the contrary, I abide to the rule for the very reasons JMichael brought up. With this established, the main push behind my query was if and how people (or groups) have found ways to (legally) integrate Evernote into their work life via personal devices, interfacing with other common workplace software and the like when the more obvious and certainly more useful option of desktop/Web client access is unavailable. For it's great utility in my personal and private business lives, this may be an instance where the compromises required to get Evernote into the workplace, or at least at its periphery, compromise its utility enough to search for alternatives. And yes, unbelievable as it may sound, on a campus populated by 25,000 students wireless access is spotty at best, and in my dark corner of the complex, nonexistent.
  2. gazumped and Joshua - I certainly appreciate the individual nature of one's "work process" or "organizational hierarchy", or whatever language we choose to describe how we do what we do, and on that note, am not anticipating any life-changing experiences to result from the adoption of another's time-tested habits. I do, however, value the opinions of others who, at some time in the personal life or professional pursuits, have similarly scratched their head and wondered, "I wonder how I should best be doing THIS." The greatest utility of these forums in particular is that they allow for individuals of otherwise disparate backgrounds to gather and share, and I will shamelessly concede that in reading them I have, on multiple occasions, disovered completely novel (to me) ways of doing or thinking about things that I had been doing or thinking about for years. I find it entertaining that some of the greatest organizational advice I was able to apply in grad school (the second time) came from a red seal carpenter-turned construction project manager, or that I was able to turn a virology post-doc onto a file naming system sourced from an Asian studies PhD. Remarkable what we can learn by talking to one another! Things like your outline, gazumped, are fantastic. I wish more were willing to share such things. I hope that once I have wrapped my head around this entire topic of systematic digital organization and project support, I too will have something to throw into the ring for discussion.
  3. It seems that your second suggestion is one which I continue to come back to, in spite of the associated cost. To clarify, yes, this academic institution allows Web access, however, it does not allow users to install software without administrative privileges (Win 7 Enterprise). If I were able to install, I likely would not be able to interface with the online database, as even this forum is blocked by the IT filter. It is an unfortunate dictocratic dilemma...one would assume they wanted their staff to do work! If one were to go the route of offline access on a second device, as a premium user, one would also be able sync the database back to the Web once a connection is re-established?
  4. Hello again. This is a brief follow-up question to my previous post. I am faced with a workplace who will not make any IT security exceptions for access to and from the Evernote servers. Not being an IT security person, and also not being one to risk my position by accessing Evernote via my own innocuously titled proxy server, I would like to know how you all in a similar locked-down position get your Evernote on. Beyond emailing to my Evernote account (for capture), I am at a loggerheads; there are no non-networked wired internet connections at said workplace, and still being in the dark ages, wireless access (monitored or not) will come riding one distant day on the back of a striped unicorn. I am thinking that a second computer (notebook) or some sort of tablet running the EN client is likely my best bet, even if it is offline. Ponying up for a wireless data connection is also a possibility, though in doing so, my effective investment in Evernote would increase by at least 10x per annum. Thoughts? Thanks to all with a suggestion or story.
  5. Hello everyone. I recognize this is a cross-post with a "Lifestyle" sub-forum and I apologize to those whose net etiquette has been offended. Recently embarking on the paperless journey, I have quickly realized that for the elegant simplicity of naming and tagging documents to be thrown into the Evernote soup and retrieved later via metadata or a robust search, there are many hang-ups in doing so with documents that one either needs to edit, ammend, aggregate, or otherwise tinker with while doing work. Whether these documents are as basic as MS Office files, or as complex as large statistical data sets, there are things that, at this juncture, just cannot live happily in the Evernote world. Without a boring discourse, I really have two fundamental questions: For those who require a file structure outside of evernote to do work (be it because of file formatting, frequent editing, sharing with non-evernoters, firewall issues for EN syncing, etc) - what, if any, program(s) do you use to achieve a similar level of ubiquitous access to your files as is provided in Evernote (i.e. Dropbox, Sugarsync, GDrive, etc.).? Whether you use a cloud sync tool or not, what is your preferred method of non-Evernote folder/file nomenclature/project structure? Does your file and folder nomenclature change if the documents are to eventually be archived in Evernote? I have grown quite fond of the YYMMDD prefix that Grumpy Monkey has adapted for his digital life, but I am struggling with how such a filing identifier can be adopted into a file naming system which also uses things like job (project) identifier codes (i.e. project 172C) to categorize and track things like costing, logistics coordination and billing. I ask these things because it appears as though I am quite unintentionally relying upon Evernote as a capture and action-related tool due to the bulk of my ongoing work taking place outside of Evernote. At the same time, I see great utility in combining the two, and at the very least would like to develop a work process that naturally feeds one into the other (or back and forth between the two). Any advice or experience in this area is, of course, much appreciated. Thank you all in advance for your valuable input on these forums. Without your willingness to share your experiences, I would still be mired in the paper/digital hinterland with the lion's share of my colleagues. It has drastically changed the way I approach information and work.
  6. Hello everyone. Recently embarking on the paperless journey, I have quickly realized that for the elegant simplicity of naming and tagging documents to be thrown into the Evernote soup and retrieved later via metadata or a robust search, there are many hang-ups in doing so with documents that one either needs to edit, ammend, aggregate, or otherwise tinker with while doing work. Whether these documents are as basic as MS Office files, or as complex as large statistical data sets, there are things that, at this juncture, just cannot live happily in the Evernote world. Without a boring discourse, I really have two fundamental questions: For those who require a file structure outside of evernote to do work (be it because of file formatting, frequent editing, sharing with non-evernoters, firewall issues for EN syncing, etc) - what, if any, program(s) do you use to achieve a similar level of ubiquitous access to your files as is provided in Evernote (i.e. Dropbox, Sugarsync, GDrive, etc.).? Whether you use a cloud sync tool or not, what is your preferred method of non-Evernote folder/file nomenclature/project structure? Does your file and folder nomenclature change if the documents are to eventually be archived in Evernote? I have grown quite fond of the YYMMDD prefix that Grumpy Monkey has adapted for his digital life, but I am struggling with how such a filing identifier can be adopted into a file naming system which also uses things like job (project) identifier codes (i.e. project 172C) to categorize and track things like costing, logistics coordination and billing. I ask these things because it appears as though I am quite unintentionally relying upon Evernote as a capture and action-related tool due to the bulk of my ongoing work taking place outside of Evernote. At the same time, I see great utility in combining the two, and at the very least would like to develop a work process that naturally feeds one into the other (or back and forth between the two). Any advice or experience in this area is, of course, much appreciated. Thank you all in advance for your valuable input on these forums. Without your willingness to share your experiences, I would still be mired in the paper/digital hinterland with the lion's share of my colleagues. It has drastically changed the way I approach information and work.
  7. Hello everyone. Recently embarking on the paperless journey, I have quickly realized that for the elegant simplicity of naming and tagging documents to be thrown into the Evernote soup and retrieved later via metadata or a robust search, there are many hang-ups in doing so with documents that one either needs to edit, ammend, aggregate, or otherwise tinker with while doing work. Whether these documents are as basic as MS Office or as complex as large statistical data sets, there are things that, at this juncture, just cannot live happily in my Evernote world. Without a boring discourse, I really have two fundamental questions: For those who require a file structure outside of evernote to do work (be it because of file formatting, frequent editing, sharing with non-evernoters, firewall issues for EN syncing, etc) - what, if any, program(s) do you use to achieve a similar level of ubiquitous access to your files as is provided in Evernote (i.e. Dropbox, Sugarsync, GDrive, etc.).? Whether you use a cloud sync tool or not, what is your preferred method of folder/file nomenclature/project structure? Does your file and folder nomenclature change if the documents are to eventually be archived in Evernote? I have grown quite fond of the YYMMDD prefix that Grumpy Monkey has adapted for his digital life, but I am struggling with how such a filing identifier can be adopted into a file naming system which also uses things like job (project) identifier codes (i.e. project 172C) to categorize and track things like costing, logistics coordination and billing. Thank you all in advance for your valuable input on these forums. Without your willingness to share your experiences, I would still be mired in the paper/digital hinterland with the lion's share of my colleagues. It has drastically changed the way I approach information and work.
  8. Heather, Thank you for the straightforward instructions. I will run a few trials on a representative sample, then re-evaluate. Just to make sure that I am following your recommendations correctly, I would like to know if you suggest uploading these .jpgs as individual images/notes, or whether combining them into a single PDF before uploading would affect the Evernote handwriting recognition process? If so, would saving as an "optimized PDF" in Acrobat affect the efficacy of recognition also? Most of these written documents are multi-pagers.... some of the resulting files at 600 dpi are quite large; it goes without saying that if one can conserve bandwidth while preserving the handwriting recognition ability, that would be the preferred option.
  9. Very well. Given that the goal would be having an OCR copy of the document (image OR pdf) both in and outside of Evernote, could you walk me through what you envision the steps to be, beyond what I listed in the OP? How would one treat images differently from PDFs or other text notes? And if I am asking a question that has been comprehensively covered elsewhere, by all means, post a link and I'll check it out before troubling you further.
  10. My apologies if this topic has been covered previously; I could not seem to find a firm answer via the search functions, so here I am. I am a new premium user after a year on Evernote, and I recently made the paperless plunge with the addition of a Scansnap 1500 on a Windows platform. I have a boat load of archived and frequently reviewed hand-written (not cursive, usually) notes that, if possible, I would like to get into a searchable format within EN. I would also like to maintain a filing structure outside of EN for these scanned documents, for both backup and non-Endnote sharing purposes. My process to this point for scans of digital documents (primary source journal articles, book chapters, proceedings, etc.) has been: scan to high quality PDF into my desktop "inbox" folder (purged at least daily) Rename PDF as per my system OCR with Acrobat X Pro Save as optimized PDF Import to my "collection box" within EN and tag/note away. (aside) then move the pdf to a cloud-synced and locally backed up folder structure Is there any merit to scanning hand-written (ink and paper) documents as jpegs? I did a trial on some older lecture notes and found that although the EN OCR function performed very well for keyword searches, relying on the EN solution leaves my non-EN notes unsearchable. I would love to minimize even my current process as much as possible while retaining as many options for the files outside of EN. Unless I was missing something, scanning multi-page written notes as images also requires one to aggregate the separate pages into one document to be uploaded as a note; this is a bit of a turn-off as well. I have gotten so much from these forums already, so thank you all, and I look forward to any responses.
×
×
  • Create New...