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iliyan

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Everything posted by iliyan

  1. OK, I see your point. I guess it's now time for the decision makers to consider whether it will be worth the effort. I did what I could to advertise the idea and its utility, and now I can only cross my fingers Thanks for the time and consideration so far!
  2. I'm still not sure where you get the notion that this is all so easy for Evernote to implement. Because what I'm suggesting is just another way of plugging an image into an Evernote note. This image just happens to represent some formula. As I showed above, it can be done even in the current version, just that the user has to do it manually. Implementing a function that grabs the selection in the document, makes an HTTP GET request to some URL (that includes that selected text) which returns an image file, and finally replaces that text in the document with the obtained image, this should not
  3. I see your point and if HTML packages have built-in MathML support that Evernote can just use, that's ok. But first I think that's not the case, and second - going for this means you won't see any math support in Evernote any time soon probably. My suggestion was to do something that's super easy and does the job to 95%. And I'm sure math support is not a priority for the Evernote team. My main wish is to get at least some support as soon as possible, hence my proposal.
  4. OK, in the original suggestion I proposed both an automatic and a manual ways of doing the conversion, I'm sorry. Of course, an automatic way (by having the user explicitly specify the delimiter) would be very convenient and still easy to implement, I believe. But I'm totally fine with having a manual option only. I don't see your point. MathML is an XML format for representing formulas with structure, so it can be interpreted. You don't write MathML manually - you use other tools to construct a formula which is then saved in MathML format. You don't want to complicate Evernote at this point
  5. Attached is a screenshot. What I currently can do is go to the web site of the service, type in my formula in their text field and then drag the image to Evernote. This obviously works but it's very inconvenient. Very nice to have would be to be just able to select a piece of text, right lick and choose "Convert to a math formula" which would just automate this process. For modification, you could right click on the image and choose an option that will replace the image with the original text stored in the ALT attribute or popup a small text box where you could edit the text and Evernote would
  6. That's not a problem at all, you've misunderstood my idea. The only thing needed is an option in the context menu that converts the selected text to an "existing web-friendly renderings like JPEG, GIF, PDF, etc." by using a web service that interprets the text as LateX (or MathML). That's everything! Now, if the stored image has an ALT attribute that contains the original piece of text the user had selected, then it would also be possible to modify that text and redo the web-service query to update the image. To the rest of Evernote this is just a simple image. No markup, special handling, not
  7. Indeed, the delimiter can be configured (I actually don't want it to be $ as in LaTeX), and the original code can be stored in an ALT attribute in the image. I know this is not a very common request, but IMO the best feature of LaTeX is its math typesetting system. LaTeX is almost exclusively for scientific publications, as well as for books that contain formulas. My main argument is that a very simple to implement UI feature can unleash great possibilities and expand your user base. I will personally take care of spreading the word And this will be a unique feature of Evernote. It's simple,
  8. I'm a happy Evernote user, but I miss a feature many people have asked for and will greatly appreciate - support for LaTeX formulas. If may sound complicated, but integration should be actually extremely simple. Here's how it could work: 1) Similarly to URL-to-hyperlink conversion, a LaTeX formula could be automatically generated by converting text surrounded by specific characters ($ in LaTeX). For example, I can type "Today we will discuss how equations of the form $ax^2 + bx + c = 0$ can be solved" 2) Finally, the formula text can be converted to an image. Luckily, there are many online ser
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