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Avrum

New productivity system, fuelled by Evernote

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Having tried GTD (even shelling out my own $ to attend Allen's training), Covey's Weekly Planning and Mark Forster's "systems, I decided to create my own system. So if you:

  • Have a flexible schedule
  • Don't jive with "next action" lists and pre-planned calendars
  • Enjoy doing things moment by moment, but...
  • Struggle with procrastination

Give this a try! All I ask is that you provide feedback, ask questions, etc. 

Thanks!

 

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Watched the Bare Bones video, but my impression was it was more journaling than GTD

"doing things moment by moment" is ok,
however we all have "things" that have to get done - I'm not seeing how those "things" are handled in your system
 

 

 

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5 hours ago, DTLow said:

Watched the Bare Bones video, but my impression was it was more journaling than GTD

Absolutely true - almost the opposite of GTD. Once the system is ready to be rolled out to a larger audience, I'm going to position this as an alternative to systems such as GTD, the Bullet Journal, etc. 

 

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"doing things moment by moment" is ok,
however we all have "things" that have to get done - I'm not seeing how those "things" are handled in your system

My "day" job is a therapist in private practice and author. When I need to see clients, these things are handled by my calendar. When I need to bring my kid to karate, that's on my calendar. Many other "things that have to get done" tasks are managed by triggers i.e. after the client leave, write the client note. 

As mentioned in the video, when I need to be reminded of something - a task, an idea, etc - it's captured by a quick note and sent to Evernote. I process all of my notes at the end of the day - adding tags for projects, checkboxes (for tasks), etc - so nothing falls through the cracks. 

Curious - can you give me an example of a "things that have to get done" that would be missed by this system? 

Thanks for sharing your thoughts DTLow.

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2 hours ago, Avrum said:

Curious - can you give me an example of a "things that have to get done" that would be missed by this system? 

Actually I was thinking of things you cover by  "I process all of my notes at the end of the day - adding tags for projects, checkboxes (for tasks), etc - so nothing falls through the cracks. 

Thats the productivity information I would be looking for

Examples - tasks for projects, how to manage them, make sure they are reviewed and done on time

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1 hour ago, DTLow said:

Actually I was thinking of things you cover by  "I process all of my notes at the end of the day - adding tags for projects, checkboxes (for tasks), etc - so nothing falls through the cracks. 

Thats the productivity information I would be looking for

Examples - tasks for projects, how to manage them, make sure they are reviewed and done on time

Exactly - the thrust of the system is choosing - in the moment - the best thing to do, relying on your intuition, creativity and (ideally) an interest in crafting your narrative. But the daily processing of your Evernote inbox ensure things are up to date. Finally, I also do a weekly review (closer to Covey than Allen), where all unfinished tasks are looked at, and updated. 

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@Avrum - Thanks for sharing your system --- and yes, I'd say your system is definitely for those who operate on a "moment to moment" basis.

While this works for you and "fits" you (and probably a lot of other people), I feel that it is ineffective in in making progress on one's intermediate and long terms goals. I've come to this conclusion by watching a lot of people over the last 40 years in both person and professional situations. I've concluded that a large portion (50%? 75%?) of people are working on the last thing that was brought to them. These people seem to be constantly interrupted by other people or other circumstances and they just drop whatever they were doing 5 minutes ago. These people don't seem to have any sense of priorities (or place little value on them) and, more importantly, there was little to no evidence that they were working on their intermediate and long terms goals.

Your system (and I feel GTD has some of the same characteristic) helps a person master the minutia of tasks. I do that, too, but at least a couple times a week, I take the time to look at my outstanding projects and ask myself which one or two are the most important and which contributes more to my goals. I try to spend more time managing projects than managing tasks, but it is hard to do.

These are two fundamentally different approaches in my mind. One should pick the one that best "fits" his/her personal style and I think you've hit on yours.

More power to you.

 

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2 minutes ago, Analyst444 said:
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I'd say your system is definitely for those who operate on a "moment to moment" basis.


As previously mentioned, I'm a family therapist in private practice and published author. I don't... can't operate "moment to moment". But as a solopreneur, I do have a lot of flexibility in my schedule, and this system is working wonderfully for those blocks of times when I can choose my activity. 
 

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While this works for you and "fits" you (and probably a lot of other people), I feel that it is ineffective in in making progress on one's intermediate and long terms goals.

If it works, it works, no? I'm about to publish my second book (November), have a full private practice, two kids, a wife and compose for film. So far, the system serves my short/interm/long term goals quite well.

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One should pick the one that best "fits" his/her personal style and I think you've hit on yours.

 

I agree with you. Truthfully - I designed the system for my specific needs. However, because I've had quite a bit of success with it, I thought i'd share it with others. 

Thanks for your comments. 

 

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