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DutchPete

What happens to my notes if Evernote goes bust?

42 posts in this topic

Thanks for that… that does answer my question on the high level… where can I access my notes on my local drive?

 

That would be the only outstanding issue… 

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Thanks for that… that does answer my question on the high level… where can I access my notes on my local drive?

 

That would be the only outstanding issue… 

 

In the Evernote Windows client open Tool/Options, on the General tab it shows you where your notes are stored.

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Thanks for that… that does answer my question on the high level… where can I access my notes on my local drive?

 

That would be the only outstanding issue… 

Just to be a little more precise about this: on the Windows  desktop client, your notes are stored locally in a SQLlite database. It''s found in the location that DutchPete mentioned, and has the extension .exb. You're kinda on your own if you want to spelunk that database, but it can be done; you'd probably want to know more about the Evernote architecture (in and around this page: https://dev.evernote.com/doc/articles/data_structure.php). Alternatively, you can export to either HTML or ENML formats, as the linked topic discusses. There are pluses and minuses to each. Or you could check out a cloud service like CloudHQ to export to other formats; again, pluses and minuses to any/all of those.

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At a high level you might ask the question "What happens if my hard drive fails?"

 

One solution is to ensure that you have a backup of your hard drive. This is a good solution for ensuring that you don't lose data when a hard drive fails.

 

Of course, with a cloud based solution, the storage solution is setup to to have multiple redundant backups, so theoretically the data is safe. But if you feel the need to have another backup under your own direct control, you can always export your notes and back them up yourself.

 

Learn more about how to export your notes from Evernote https://evernote.com/contact/support/kb/#!/article/28607737

Here's how the export format works http://blog.evernote.com/tech/2013/08/08/evernote-export-format-enex/

 

As for your question about work. Does your work use "Evernote" or "Evernote business"?

If the former, then JimKn makes a good point.

If the latter, then your business has already defined the terms of how and when you can take your business notes away from a business when you sever your relationship with them, but you will always have access to your personal notes.

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If you export notes, be aware that when you reimport them into Evernote, although the notes themselves are fine, all internal links (i.e. the links between notes) are irremediably broken.

If you save the entire database (usename.exb file) and reintroduce that back into Evernote, all internal notes remain intact.

But with export/reimport you can choose which notes to put bqck, with the database you cannot.

In any case, beware of the export/reimport note link issue. I was not & lost all my internal links.

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Technical redundancy is besides the point. I understand the issues around HD's and have RAIDS and back-ups setup. Sure there's fire but I also link up in various locaitons.

 

What I'm worried about is compliance to the T&C's and your data, which may be sensitive. When a company is nearing bankruptcy they might do "whatever it takes" in order to save their financial situation. Selling data can be a matter of survival, even if you a 'safe' by an agreement you may never know what happens to the data in the cloud - which, can be quite sensitive at times… and that's only the worst case scenario. Essentially they may in such a case just lack the resources to make sure your data stays private, there could also be a take over which may mean a different set of values around data. And if anyone thinks that this may not happen due to Evernote's strength right now; think again. There are not many companies that actually survive for, say, over 50 years or even 30 years… 

 

 

I guess the answer to how to pull out of the service in case of doubt and still have access to your data is an export of your notes into HTML or enex I guess if there are other software solutions in the future that can also read enex… though I wonder if there's a place on the HD where the files/database are stored? I can't find anything in the library… 

 

Any input around that? 

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Technical redundancy is besides the point. I understand the issues around HD's and have RAIDS and back-ups setup. Sure there's fire but I also link up in various locaitons.

 

What I'm worried about is compliance to the T&C's and your data, which may be sensitive. When a company is nearing bankruptcy they might do "whatever it takes" in order to save their financial situation. Selling data can be a matter of survival, even if you a 'safe' by an agreement you may never know what happens to the data in the cloud - which, can be quite sensitive at times... 

 

 

I guess the answer is you can export your notes in enex or HTML… though I wonder if there's a place on the HD where the files are stored? I can't find anything in the library… 

 

Any input around that? 

For desktop machines, yes, your data is stored, in toto, on your local hard drive. On Windows, you can find the SQLlite database via Tools / Options / General / Open Database Folder. On the Mac, I don't know, but it's there somewhere.

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on mac it is even easier to access -- it's even searchable through spotlight.

http://www.christopher-mayo.com/?p=135

if evernote disappeared tomorrow (unlikely), your data would be safe and sound. but, if your notes somehow got corrupted (some rare, isolated incidents in the past -- old notes overwriting new, attachments going missing, shard problems, etc.), you'd need a backup. backups are always recommended for everything. for mac folks, it is as easy as plugging in an external hard drive and starting time machine.

http://www.christopher-mayo.com/?p=962

@ jefito

click on the link and evernote the page! i've got the mac folks covered :)

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Let's just agree to disagree on the point "your data is safe when a company goes bust". I don't think it is you think it is. The point I'm making is you can't know for sure. And it is actually highly likely that Evernote will not exist forever - the only question is: will it survive me. For the purpose of the conversation it doesn't matter. 

 

What matters is:

 

Where can I find the local evernote database on my Mac?

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Let's just agree to disagree on the point "your data is safe when a company goes bust". I don't think it is you think it is. The point I'm making is you can't know for sure. And it is actually highly likely that Evernote will not exist forever - the only question is: will it survive me. For the purpose of the conversation it doesn't matter.

What matters is:

Where can I find the local evernote database on my Mac?

please read my post. the location is easy to find. all of your data is there on your mac.

you might disagree that all of our data is safe, but i don't see any evidence for your objection. turn off the internet and give it a try. there it is. go into time machine and there it is.

now, my definition of safe on the cloud includes zero knowledge encryption, so i guess it is always unsafe from my perspective! we can agree to agree about it with this definition :) you seem to be thinking along the same lines.

to put it into perspective, think about dropbox. all of your data is in there, but it is also on your machine. as long as you are backing up your machine, even if something terrible happened on the cloud, all your data would be in your hands, right? dropbox has encryption, but it also holds the keys, so i consider it meaningless. your scenario, a rogue employee, etc. is always a possibility with the cloud. Hence, my feature request for zero-knowledge encrypted notebooks in Evernote.

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Let's just agree to disagree on the point "your data is safe when a company goes bust". I don't think it is you think it is. The point I'm making is you can't know for sure. And it is actually highly likely that Evernote will not exist forever - the only question is: will it survive me. For the purpose of the conversation it doesn't matter. 

 

What matters is:

 

Where can I find the local evernote database on my Mac?

 I don't agree with you: the fact that you have your data on your local drive as well means that, even if Evernote were to disappear from 1 day to the next, you still have that copy of ALL your data on your local drive.

 

However, if on that same fateful day you were to drop your computer & your hard drive would be irreparably damaged, you should still be OK if you have backed up your data to e.g. an external hard drive, or a USB stick, or a 3rd party cloud (Google Drive, OneDrive, SpiderOak, ....) or whatever it may be.

So there is no need to keep hammering the point, just be aware that your data is your sole responsibility, not Evernote's !!!

 

As far as selling your data is concerned, the likes of Google, Yahoo & others have been doing it for years already, quite legally. If you were not aware of it, then you are now.

 

Your local database on your Mac: see Grumpy Monkey's mail above. If that is still no good, just search amongst all your folders & you'll find it.

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Apologies about that … Grumpy did indeed provide the answer to my question and I agree that no data is entirely safe on the cloud … all the more important to be able to "pull your data" if one day you feel it isn't secured on dropbox/evernote/drive whatever service it may be ...

 

Thanks all this is brilliant help...

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Apologies about that … Grumpy did indeed provide the answer to my question and I agree that no data is entirely safe on the cloud … all the more important to be able to "pull your data" if one day you feel it isn't secured on dropbox/evernote/drive whatever service it may be ...

 

Thanks all this is brilliant help...

glad we could help. please keep beating the drums to raise awareness about cloud security. only by clearly broadcasting to companies that we have a minimum expectation of zero-knowledge encryption will we see necessary changes. i wonder how many horror stories it will take before people demand it (see my site for some terrible ones -- there are more every day). evernote is as secure as many well-known cloud services, so it isn't doing anything wrong. the problem is that it could be doing better. i am still waiting for the "sexy" encryption options the ceo promised us a little more than a year ago...

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Apologies about that … Grumpy did indeed provide the answer to my question and I agree that no data is entirely safe on the cloud … all the more important to be able to "pull your data" if one day you feel it isn't secured on dropbox/evernote/drive whatever service it may be ...

 

Thanks all this is brilliant help...

glad we could help. please keep beating the drums to raise awareness about cloud security. only by clearly broadcasting to companies that we have a minimum expectation of zero-knowledge encryption will we see necessary changes. i wonder how many horror stories it will take before people demand it (see my site for some terrible ones -- there are more every day). evernote is as secure as many well-known cloud services, so it isn't doing anything wrong. the problem is that it could be doing better. i am still waiting for the "sexy" encryption options the ceo promised us a little more than a year ago...

 

 

Zero-knowledge encryption is a relative term because it is not always 200% zero-knowledge - see e.g. this article http://www.cloudwards.net/spideroak-or-wuala-which-is-more-secure/ about 2 companies with almost (it transpires) zero-knowledge. Tresorit might be "200%" zero-knowledge, I know of no others. I dont use Tresorit by the way.

 

As for Evernote, they are far from zero-knowledge. But we are now getting off the original subject of this thread.

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Apologies about that … Grumpy did indeed provide the answer to my question and I agree that no data is entirely safe on the cloud … all the more important to be able to "pull your data" if one day you feel it isn't secured on dropbox/evernote/drive whatever service it may be ...

 

Thanks all this is brilliant help...

glad we could help. please keep beating the drums to raise awareness about cloud security. only by clearly broadcasting to companies that we have a minimum expectation of zero-knowledge encryption will we see necessary changes. i wonder how many horror stories it will take before people demand it (see my site for some terrible ones -- there are more every day). evernote is as secure as many well-known cloud services, so it isn't doing anything wrong. the problem is that it could be doing better. i am still waiting for the "sexy" encryption options the ceo promised us a little more than a year ago...

 

Zero-knowledge encryption is a relative term because it is not always 200% zero-knowledge - see e.g. this article http://www.cloudwards.net/spideroak-or-wuala-which-is-more-secure/ about 2 companies with almost (it transpires) zero-knowledge. Tresorit might be "200%" zero-knowledge, I know of no others. I dont use Tresorit by the way.

 

As for Evernote, they are far from zero-knowledge. But we are now getting off the original subject of this thread.

I use zero-knowledge loosely to mean companies that encrypt your data but do not hold the encryption key. In fact, it seems to be quite difficult to "prove" that this is the case on the cloud. The link was extremely informative, and I encourage people to read it along with the blogs at each company. I use SpiderOak myself. It's not perfect, but I think this is a huge step forward in terms of safety / security / privacy / anonymity in the cloud. Evernote is very, very far away from this emerging standard. I don't know why, because the company leaders are knowledgable about this stuff.

As for the topic, it is tangentially related to the OP's question. When companies go bust or near it, things happen. It takes a year or so to get rid of your data in EN, so you could potentially have your data floating around for a while without daily management. Fortunately, Evernote has publicly made its position clear, and they will not "sell" your data, so we are really speculating about the realm of impropriety or illegality. At least some of this concern could be assuaged by zero knowledge encryption for notebooks.

It is worth stressing, in relation to the OP's original question, that your data is very much in your hands. It's just that some of us think we should also ask who else's hands it could potentially get into. Speculation, to be sure, but useful nonetheless. Feel free to flag me as a spammer, report me, move me, or anything else you believe should be done. I'm prepared to be moderated!

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Apologies about that … Grumpy did indeed provide the answer to my question and I agree that no data is entirely safe on the cloud … all the more important to be able to "pull your data" if one day you feel it isn't secured on dropbox/evernote/drive whatever service it may be ...

 

Thanks all this is brilliant help...

glad we could help. please keep beating the drums to raise awareness about cloud security. only by clearly broadcasting to companies that we have a minimum expectation of zero-knowledge encryption will we see necessary changes. i wonder how many horror stories it will take before people demand it (see my site for some terrible ones -- there are more every day). evernote is as secure as many well-known cloud services, so it isn't doing anything wrong. the problem is that it could be doing better. i am still waiting for the "sexy" encryption options the ceo promised us a little more than a year ago...

 

Zero-knowledge encryption is a relative term because it is not always 200% zero-knowledge - see e.g. this article http://www.cloudwards.net/spideroak-or-wuala-which-is-more-secure/ about 2 companies with almost (it transpires) zero-knowledge. Tresorit might be "200%" zero-knowledge, I know of no others. I dont use Tresorit by the way.

 

As for Evernote, they are far from zero-knowledge. But we are now getting off the original subject of this thread.

I use zero-knowledge loosely to mean companies that encrypt your data but do not hold the encryption key. In fact, it seems to be quite difficult to "prove" that this is the case on the cloud. The link was extremely informative, and I encourage people to read it along with the blogs at each company. I use SpiderOak myself. It's not perfect, but I think this is a huge step forward in terms of safety / security / privacy / anonymity in the cloud. Evernote is very, very far away from this emerging standard. I don't know why, because the company leaders are knowledgable about this stuff.

As for the topic, it is tangentially related to the OP's question. When companies go bust or near it, things happen. It takes a year or so to get rid of your data in EN, so you could potentially have your data floating around for a while without daily management. Fortunately, Evernote has publicly made its position clear, and they will not "sell" your data, so we are really speculating about the realm of impropriety or illegality. At least some of this concern could be assuaged by zero knowledge encryption for notebooks.

It is worth stressing, in relation to the OP's original question, that your data is very much in your hands. It's just that some of us think we should also ask who else's hands it could potentially get into. Speculation, to be sure, but useful nonetheless. Feel free to flag me as a spammer, report me, move me, or anything else you believe should be done. I'm prepared to be moderated!

 

 

Thanks GM & you are a fine moderator. By the way, I use Wuala & am very happy with it & it also has a better allowance than SpiderOak.

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Apologies about that … Grumpy did indeed provide the answer to my question and I agree that no data is entirely safe on the cloud … all the more important to be able to "pull your data" if one day you feel it isn't secured on dropbox/evernote/drive whatever service it may be ...

 

Thanks all this is brilliant help...

glad we could help. please keep beating the drums to raise awareness about cloud security. only by clearly broadcasting to companies that we have a minimum expectation of zero-knowledge encryption will we see necessary changes. i wonder how many horror stories it will take before people demand it (see my site for some terrible ones -- there are more every day). evernote is as secure as many well-known cloud services, so it isn't doing anything wrong. the problem is that it could be doing better. i am still waiting for the "sexy" encryption options the ceo promised us a little more than a year ago...

 

Zero-knowledge encryption is a relative term because it is not always 200% zero-knowledge - see e.g. this article http://www.cloudwards.net/spideroak-or-wuala-which-is-more-secure/ about 2 companies with almost (it transpires) zero-knowledge. Tresorit might be "200%" zero-knowledge, I know of no others. I dont use Tresorit by the way.

 

As for Evernote, they are far from zero-knowledge. But we are now getting off the original subject of this thread.

I use zero-knowledge loosely to mean companies that encrypt your data but do not hold the encryption key. In fact, it seems to be quite difficult to "prove" that this is the case on the cloud. The link was extremely informative, and I encourage people to read it along with the blogs at each company. I use SpiderOak myself. It's not perfect, but I think this is a huge step forward in terms of safety / security / privacy / anonymity in the cloud. Evernote is very, very far away from this emerging standard. I don't know why, because the company leaders are knowledgable about this stuff.

As for the topic, it is tangentially related to the OP's question. When companies go bust or near it, things happen. It takes a year or so to get rid of your data in EN, so you could potentially have your data floating around for a while without daily management. Fortunately, Evernote has publicly made its position clear, and they will not "sell" your data, so we are really speculating about the realm of impropriety or illegality. At least some of this concern could be assuaged by zero knowledge encryption for notebooks.

It is worth stressing, in relation to the OP's original question, that your data is very much in your hands. It's just that some of us think we should also ask who else's hands it could potentially get into. Speculation, to be sure, but useful nonetheless. Feel free to flag me as a spammer, report me, move me, or anything else you believe should be done. I'm prepared to be moderated!

 

Thanks GM & you are a fine moderator. By the way, I use Wuala & am very happy with it & it also has a better allowance than SpiderOak.

i'll look into wuala. to be honest, though, i might be able to work without the cloud by this winter. i have a pretty good system set up for myself right now, and very little makes use of cloud services. my particular work situation is flexible this way, but i could also see how even a few small changes in my work would make the cloud necessary again for the stuff i want to get done. we'll see. at any rate, i'm glad there is competition i the security / privacy space. i hope evernote will jump into the fray sooner rather than later.

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