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Random thoughtage here - I have a variety of checks that get rid of notes that are past their sell-by date.  It seems like a good idea to trim my database whenever I can - it saves storage locally and on the servers,  improves sync time,  backup time,  search times,  saves server real estate and stops me hitting that 100,000 note limit sooner rather than later*.

 

I've scanned all sorts of things that have a natural sell-by date - instructions for things I no longer have,  receipts and guarantees that are long out of date,  notes and reminders for projects long dead.  But how do I find them?  Some checks work - I delete notes as a matter of normal business;  when searches find stuff that isn't relevant;  when reminders come due and don't have any other value than just the act of reminding.  But the notes that I don't find - instructions for that automatic yolk remover** from decades ago that I never used;  the 'test notes' that I keep on forgetting to kill after the event;  the shared notes that were never read...

 

So my request is for statistics.  "Hit" figures (how many times viewed) for each note so I can see which ones I use a lot,  and those which I never went back to after their creation.  If we had a stats function,  able to sort notes by number of hits as well as by the other current search terms,  I could probably remove tens or hundreds of MB from my existing database and save Evernote from needing to buy another data centre - at least for a week or two...

 

Hit figures have been requested before for internet views,  and that would be useful for blog and web pages for the usual reasons.

 

I appreciate this is a long-term ask,  because it needs a lot of integration within a complicated product across multiple platforms - but it surely would be nice to have and has serious benefits for both users and developers.

 

Thanks for listening.

 

:)

 

* That is an egg zaggeration: I'm on 17,000 notes after 5 years of 'active' use which suggests another 20 - 25 years before I hit the current limit and by which time

1) Evernote will have increased it and

2) I will probably have egg spired and won't care anyway

 

** yep - you're right - It's just an eggsample...

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I think hit statistics would definitely be helpful. 

I wonder about accuracy though, and relatedly, would it matter if it was inaccurate?

That is, a lot of the time notes get opened accidentally or in the process of finding some other note, or because it happened to  be at the top of the list upon launch, etc. These would be counted as "hits", so the odds of ever having a zero-hit note are slim. 

 

But, then the question is, does it matter if it isn't entirely accurate? Is the relative difference in hits between more important than finding zero-hit notes? 

 

I think, in general, making available/more easily accessible more database metadata, including "hits" could be both fun and helpful.

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I'm interested in all kinds of data: how many notes created each day, devices used, number of views, etc. We've asked for it in the past, but no luck yet. As Evernote appeals to Lifehackers and Quantified Life people, I think it is in their best interest to make this kind of stuff available, especially to Premium members. It's one of those plus alpha things that would make it stand out from other services. In my estimation, it would be a "diagnostic" for your external brain.

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It'd be great to get usage to see if premium/plus is worth it. For instance, in the past 2 months, I've created 4.55 notes/day. Stats like that might help convince users to sign on.

On another note I still think packages are overpriced or there needs to be another cost-friendly paid tier, but that's another discussion...

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