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tennbuck2

(Archived) JPEG'S not indexed and thus not searchable

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I'm using my iPhone and iPad to take various pictures and screenshots. I've set up IFTTT to transfer pics to Evernote folders automatically. Taking a picture of a business card would be an example here. I cannot find key words in these photos using Evernote search function. The status of the note in the "info" section states that "no attachments have been indexed". I thought maybe I just needed to give Evernote's servers time to index this files, but it's now been two days. Any thoughts? 

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Do you have a Premium subscription? If so, I think things are usually OCRed in a day or two. If you have the free version, it can take longer.

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Have you synced? The indexing occurs on the EN servers & needs to be synced back down to your iOS app. Also, indexing images produces a tree of possibilities. IOW, an image with the word 'house' may show up when searching on 'horse'.

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I'll weigh in with what will be probably viewed as heretical.  While indexing text found in images is interesting, I personally find it to not be reliable enough to be able to locate a note, but at the same time result in false positives in searches.  

 

I image most business cards I receive either with my phone's camera or on one of several scanners.  In one case, I have a card that was imaged on a flat bed scanner. The card got skewed when I closed the scanner lid and the image is probably about 20 degrees off the horizontal.  Still, that card will come up with no problem if I search on company name or street name. 

 

Another card for a business on the same road (which is why this example sticks in my mind) is a straight and perfectly clear image, good contrast and lighting and has been imaged with both a phone camera and scanner, but for the life of me, Evernote will not find it based on the image.  

 

And then there was a note written by my vet for a dosage of glucosomene for my dog.  The vet probably took a penmanship class at the medical school. The note was written in a hurry on a paper towel and was then folded up and creased. I took a picture of it with the phone camera.  Still, I type in "Gluco" the image will pop up with the handwriting high lighted. . 

 

I guess the take away is that I don't rely on indexing text in images but rather use descriptive titles and tags.  YMMV

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I'll weigh in with what will be probably viewed as heretical.  While indexing text found in images is interesting, I personally find it to not be reliable enough to be able to locate a note, but at the same time result in false positives in searches.  

 

I image most business cards I receive either with my phone's camera or on one of several scanners.  In one case, I have a card that was imaged on a flat bed scanner. The card got skewed when I closed the scanner lid and the image is probably about 20 degrees off the horizontal.  Still, that card will come up with no problem if I search on company name or street name. 

 

Another card for a business on the same road (which is why this example sticks in my mind) is a straight and perfectly clear image, good contrast and lighting and has been imaged with both a phone camera and scanner, but for the life of me, Evernote will not find it based on the image.  

 

And then there was a note written by my vet for a dosage of glucosomene for my dog.  The vet probably took a penmanship class at the medical school. The note was written in a hurry on a paper towel and was then folded up and creased. I took a picture of it with the phone camera.  Still, I type in "Gluco" the image will pop up with the handwriting high lighted. . 

 

I guess the take away is that I don't rely on indexing text in images but rather use descriptive titles and tags.  YMMV

I don't know why you think this is heretical. As I said, indexing text from images differs from indexing pure text in that it produces a tree of possibilities. The example I also gave (house/horse) is an example of false positives as well. I do find that indexing of clear text (not handwriting) in images seems to work well for me. But I prefer to not rely upon the EN's indexing, whenever possible. So yes, after I scan a business card, I change the title to include the name of the company and/or the person. This is also helpful if I need to refine my search. IOW, if searching on "aetna joe smith" produces too many results, I can do an intitle search of "aetna joe smith".

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BnF,

 

"heretical" comment wasn't directed at you or anybody in particular.  I just find it somewhat odd and interesting that folks seem to get upset when the text-in-image indexing doesn't seem to work for them, when in reality, while it is an interesting application, it can often provide too much stuff back at you.  Sometimes I wish I could turn it off.  Like you, I think titles and tags are the way to go. But to each his own. 

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