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C. Wollenhaupt

(Archived) Where's Evernote going?

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The past few months have left me worried about Evernote...

We had a disastrous experience with the Safari 5.1 clipper which took forever to get fixed. I personally even dropped Safari in the process because I really need the clipper functionality. Shared notebooks are still in its infancy and are treated like unwanted step-children. There's no search across regular and shared notebooks, tags can only be created by the owner, web clipping doesn't work, not even drag&drop between a regular and a shared notebook. It took ages to get formatted editing capabilities on the iPad and still today the Evernote editor is lightyears behind OneNote in the desktop version.

I haven't a single installation of Evernote that is showing the same number of notes in my notebooks on any computer or the web interface. Can I manually resync a notebook? No, the only way is to delete everything from a computer, download the enture archive of 4000 notes and hope for the best.

Honestly, Evernote has a great concept. But there is so much that need to get fixed quickly. I had confidence that you guys were working on these problems, that things just took longer because of unforeseen issues. It's software development, after all.

Now I'm not so sure anymore... Week after week you release completely unrelated products like Skitch, Evernote Hello, Evernote Peek, and more... Development effort that I expected to go into the core product.

Does Evernote still have a future? Are YOU still committed to Evernote?

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I feel like you might be jumping to a conclusion here (you pose it as a question, but obviously you think Evernote's future is in jeopardy). Let's assume that Evernote's core mission is to help you remember everything (that's what their website says), and let's take a look at the issues you raised:

1. Safari clipper. I don't know anything about this, but it appears to have been fixed, so not an issue anymore. That is a good thing, right?

2. Shared notebooks. I wouldn't call this a core feature. Assuming Evernote's core mission applies to an individual's memories, and not the collaborative construction of group memories ("projects" in the business world), then the limits kind of make sense. Evernote is a bit confusing on this (see their blog), because they seem to be conflating "collaboration" with "sharing." Anyhow, I can see something like dragging and dropping as a nice feature, but not high on the priority list.

3. iOS formatting. It looks like you are saying they are the best app on the market. The fact that it took "ages," but even a behemoth like Microsoft hasn't developed it, should give you some idea of the effort that probably went into improving the app. That is a good thing, right?

4. Different numbers of notes. My numbers match exactly across the OSX, Web, and iOS apps. I don't have that problem. Perhaps you need to create a support ticket?

Am I correct in saying that the only "problem" here is the numbers of notes in your notebook that don't match? This is serious, but I wonder how widespread it is.

It seems important to me that we separate what we think Evernote ought to be from what Evernote is. There are plenty of bugs and performance issues in Evernote (see my other threads), and lots of things we hope that they will improve/add/change, but that is true of any application.

Personally, I think Evernote is headed in the right direction, especially if they can solve the iOS problems. We'll have to wait and see, but if past precedent is any indication of future success, Evernote seems to have a pretty bright future.

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I think that it might be of interest, before worrying about where Evernote is going, to consider what Evernote is?

As best as I can tell, Evernote is a platform for building and retaining digital memories. The platform provides fairly simple facilities to create, collect, and organize those memories and to share them with others. To that end, there are a number of clients on different computer platforms available that help you to do that (it's known that each of the individual clients has its own set of quirks and issues). But there's more than just a set of clients: there's an API that allows developers to make tools to add in to Evernote's capabilities. Those capabilities, by the way -- and as noted -- are still fairly simple, and there's obvious pressure to improve on all fronts, sharing included. These things are important, and I'm pretty sure we'll see improvements as we go along.

BTW: Skitch was developed by a separate company, before being bought out by Evernote. Evernote Food and Evernote Hello were developed, I believe, by folks who were not Evernote employees (though maybe under contract). Don't be fooled by their appearance on the scene at a time when the software that's actually maintained by Evernote has known problems (and continues to get worked on). It's often easy from outside to second-guess what's going on inside. Evernote is still growing and hiring, as far as I know.

Short answer from a non-Evernote employee: yes, Evernote has a future, I'm committed (as an Evernote user), and my sense is that the folks behind Evernote are, too.

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I haven't a single installation of Evernote that is showing the same number of notes in my notebooks on any computer or the web interface. Can I manually resync a notebook? No, the only way is to delete everything from a computer, download the enture archive of 4000 notes and hope for the best.

You need to file a support request. See my signature for link.

There are a lot of valid reasons for differences, and, some known problems which require fix at the service.

See here for some of the reasons.

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Does Evernote still have a future?

Other organizations certainly think so.

Inc Magazine named Evernote as the Company of Year

http://www.inc.com/m...f-the-year.html

Techcrunch on Evernote's longterm goals

http://techcrunch.co...million-a-year/

Evernote gets $50 million

http://blog.evernote.com/2011/07/13/evernote-gets-50-million-in-funding-with-faq/

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I'm guessing that all of the people that work at Evernote don't care any more and are just sitting around picking up their pay checks and sipping west coast home made chilled soups.

If you can find me a software company that doesn't have issues and bugs I will show you my piece of real alien space ship that I found in St Paul's Cathedral.

One of the great things about Evernote is that they always treat your data as your data so it is easy to get out and go somewhere else if you are not happy.

Sounds to me like you need your account reindexing - open a support ticket and they get it done pretty quickly.

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Hmmmm...

The alien ship in the dome of St. Paul's Cathedral in London.

Alien Ship Interior

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The

I think that it might be of interest, before worrying about where Evernote is going, to consider what Evernote is?

As best as I can tell, Evernote is a platform for building and retaining digital memories. The platform provides fairly simple facilities to create, collect, and organize those memories and to share them with others.

Which raises an interesting point - I wonder what percentage of Evernote users are interested in or are making use of the sharing capabilities? I can completely understand how for many people that might be core to their experience but I have no need for or use of sharing capabilities.

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Which raises an interesting point - I wonder what percentage of Evernote users are interested in or are making use of the sharing capabilities? I can completely understand how for many people that might be core to their experience but I have no need for or use of sharing capabilities.

Based upon this post, by Dave Engberg (CTO of EN):

"Basically, a bunch of the people who built Evernote have a lot of experience in the "Enterprise software sales" business, and it's completely 180-degree different than Evernote's "freemium" personal memory service. It's hard to do both business models under the same roof, in my experience. "

(Emphasis, mine.) It appears that the focus is on the individual with fairly simple sharing for families, rather than geared toward true business collaboration. Like yourself, I have little to no interest in sharing any of my notes.

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I find it very useful to share notes with other people, I use it rarely but when I do use it - it's a godsend

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Which raises an interesting point - I wonder what percentage of Evernote users are interested in or are making use of the sharing capabilities? I can completely understand how for many people that might be core to their experience but I have no need for or use of sharing capabilities.

For the life of me, I can't imagine another human being on the planet who would be interested in sharing (or with whom I would want to share) what I put in Evernote, except perhaps the occasional recipe. :)

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With a two married kids in the military (changing home locations frequently), my Evernote shared family address notebook is very helpful among my other family members.

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except perhaps the occasional recipe. ;)

OTOH, I do have this shared notebook linked to my account:

I have 1007 recipes in my evernote cookbook, "A Moveable Feast." I include tags, pictures and links to recipes I find online, or make myself. I've made it publicly available and a lot of my friends and clients use it as well. You all can get to it here. Enjoy!

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Does Evernote still have a future? Are YOU still committed to Evernote?

Absolutely agree. Evernote seems to be working on unrelated applications such as "Evernote Clearly". Many CSS stylesheet-strippers already exist, unsure why Evernote is also doing this.

I've been unsuccessfully lobbying for plain text support, and the ability of users to be able to freely enter notes without having to worry about their line spacing getting lost, or their font getting changed, or anything like that. Simple plain text seems like something that could be knocked out fairly quickly, in less time than it would have taken them to make "Evernote Clearly". I'm disappointed.

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Does Evernote still have a future? Are YOU still committed to Evernote?

Absolutely agree. Evernote seems to be working on unrelated applications such as "Evernote Clearly". Many CSS stylesheet-strippers already exist, unsure why Evernote is also doing this.

I've been unsuccessfully lobbying for plain text support, and the ability of users to be able to freely enter notes without having to worry about their line spacing getting lost, or their font getting changed, or anything like that. Simple plain text seems like something that could be knocked out fairly quickly, in less time than it would have taken them to make "Evernote Clearly". I'm disappointed.

The Evernote app seems to be working great for me. There are some exceptions on the iOS platform, but the worst problems there have largely been solved. What, specifically, has disappointed you?

Evernote Clearly and other products are related to their stated goal of helping you remember stuff. I don't think they are just throwing spaghetti at the wall and seeing what sticks like an Evernote version of Angry Birds. I don't work at Evernote, but if it is like any other company, there are several projects going on at once. Some are in development and others are at a mature stage. But, everyone isn't working on the same thing. That seems normal, and a good thing to me.

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Hi Krellan

[...]

I've been unsuccessfully lobbying for plain text support, and the ability of users to be able to freely enter notes without having to worry about their line spacing getting lost, or their font getting changed, or anything like that. Simple plain text seems like something that could be knocked out fairly quickly, in less time than it would have taken them to make "Evernote Clearly". I'm disappointed.

I just stumbled upon this thread and your statement on plain text support. IMHO, due to Evernote's many client apps and the underlying data structure , it is not just a quick job to "knock out plain text". Evernote uses an HTML variant to store the note contents. Okay, you can simulate plain text in HTML. But in order to edit the note in plain text, you would need to update all client apps, which is probably a huge effort. (An example for an app handling both plain text and HTML text could be your mail client, where you can switch between plain text and HTML text as the body's content format).You would also need to redefine the HTML format (known as ENML) and the API. This may become a problem with 3rd party apps.

While I sympathize with your desire to have plain text input, you have to realize that it is not just that easy to accomplish.

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Does Evernote still have a future? Are YOU still committed to Evernote?

Absolutely agree. Evernote seems to be working on unrelated applications such as "Evernote Clearly". Many CSS stylesheet-strippers already exist, unsure why Evernote is also doing this.

Clearly, is, well, clearly related to core functionality which is to remember things. I saw some statistics a while back on how people used Evernote. No, I don't remember where as I forgot to clip it but, as I recall, most of what goes into Evernote is clippings from web pages. Clearly makes clipping webpages that much easier. Sure, there are other stylesheet strippers but I haven't found one so perfectly integrated into Evernote.

As far as plain text support goes, many plain text editors already exist, right? :)

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Looks like the Food app was developed specifically for Phil Libin, especially considering all the japanese food in the promo vid...

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To answer the OP's question, yes I am still committed to Evernote. In fact I went "all in" last September, after experimenting with it for a few months. This was right when the seriousness of the the text entry issues was becoming apparent. But I believe EN when they say they're in this to stay (I think the phrase was to be a 100 year company). I worried a little about whether it was a good decision to put all my info into EN but most of the functionality I use has been working and continues to work very well, and text entry is coming along. As for the new apps, I think I would worry more if there was nothing new coming out. The fact that EN continues to explore new avenues for providing their core service means they are committed to growing the company, and growth is necessary to stay around for 100 years.

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It's worth adding that, even while we rolled out new apps, new versions in almost every one of the Evernote clients was rolled out as well at around the same time. They don't garner as much press, but still important to note. No small feat.

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As far as plain text support goes, many plain text editors already exist, right? ;)

Yes, but none so cleanly integrated across multiple platforms, clients, and "the cloud", than Evernote. That's what drew me into Evernote in the first place: the ability to take my notes (originally written over many years of PalmPilot usage) and put them someplace where I could get to them more easily. The earlier versions of Evernote that I used at first, really impressed me, by their ability to function as quick note-takers. However, it seems that the product has evolved more to the point where it's trying to be a word processing engine, not a quick general note-taker. When I enter notes these days, I spend more time trying to fight the automatic formatting, font changes, indentation changes, line spacing collapsing, and so on, than actually entering notes. It's a real distractor, and oftentimes by the time I get access to the note, I find myself forgetting what I wanted to enter!

If Evernote stores data internally in a HTML-like format, that might explain it. However, it should still be possible to turn off the automatic application of fonts, formatting, etc. and just preserve the text that the user entered. I oftentimes find myself having to defensively enter many spaces between each line, knowing that I'll lose a few of them every time the note passes through another Evernote app that insists on "cleaning up" my formatting....

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[snip]

While I sympathize with your desire to have plain text input, you have to realize that it is not just that easy to accomplish.

With all due respect, this should not be the case. Evernote stores data in ENML, but plain text notes just stuff a bunch of text between the tags <en-note> and </en-note>. Extracting that text into a text editor is not hard. In addition, the Evernote Open Source project "Emacs Evernote Mode" (see http://www.evernote.com/about/developer/projects.php) supports editing Evernote notes, incuding plain text notes. If two unpaid developers can support plain text, the Evernote company should be able to support it in the application.

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i don't know much about the topic, but i would also like to see plain text input. ideally, i would like plain text as default and rich text as an option. evernote had plain text input in the past on some clients like ios. obviously, that is not a technological challenge.

however, they made a design decision to make rich text the only choice. i don't like it, but i imagine it has cut down on complaints about attachments and formatting being lost when people tried to edit notes on platforms that only had plain text support. evernote has to operate consistently across several platforms (mac, ios, android, windows, blackberry, etc.) and i think every change is complicated. third party apps don't. life is probably a lot easier for them.

i don't know if they should or shouldn't make plain text possible, but i do hope they consider it.

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With a two married kids in the military (changing home locations frequently), my Evernote shared family address notebook is very helpful among my other family members.

Sharing is extremely useful in family situations. Having copies of critical documents (birth certificates, passports, etc) in shared notebooks can be a lifesaver for families.

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[snip]

While I sympathize with your desire to have plain text input, you have to realize that it is not just that easy to accomplish.

With all due respect, this should not be the case. Evernote stores data in ENML, but plain text notes just stuff a bunch of text between the tags <en-note> and </en-note>. Extracting that text into a text editor is not hard. In addition, the Evernote Open Source project "Emacs Evernote Mode" (see http://www.evernote....er/projects.php) supports editing Evernote notes, incuding plain text notes. If two unpaid developers can support plain text, the Evernote company should be able to support it in the application.

You are right: it is easy to present the ENML code. Actually, I developed a webapp called "ENML Editor", http://enml-editor.ping13.net, that does just that. The problem with ENML code is that its glibberish to 95% of the 20+ million users of Evernote. And for the rest who know HTML don't want to edit ENML code other than fixing things. IMHO, the ENML editor is just for nerds).

Of course you could put plain text in an empty note - just try it with the ENML Editor. If you input the following:


<?xml version='1.0' encoding='utf-8'?>
<!DOCTYPE en-note SYSTEM "http://xml.evernote.com/pub/enml2.dtd">
<en-note style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space;">
This is a test
Another test, indented

above is an empty line
</en-note>

You'll get a note with only one line: "This is a test Another test, indented above is an empty line". So, spaces and newlines are not preserved. If you want to preserve them, you need to convert plaintext to an HTML code, which could look like this:


<?xml version='1.0' encoding='utf-8'?>
<!DOCTYPE en-note SYSTEM "http://xml.evernote.com/pub/enml2.dtd">
<en-note style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space;">
This is a test
<br />
  Another test, indented
<br />
 
<br />
above is an empty line
</en-note>

And this is just the tip of the iceberg. I don't know whether the Emacs mode presents ENML or a converted plaintext version of ENML. But to make a (two-way?) conversion between ENML and plaintext possible, you really need to take care of lots of things (handling of rich text elements, images, Evernote encrpytion, todos, ...).

My understanding is that people want to input plain text just as they can do in e.g. Simplenote, https://simple-note.appspot.com/. But plain text input is a completely different mode, comparable to switching the mode in a mail client between rich text and plaintext (try to do a roundtrip conversion there - not possible).

How exactly would you like to use plain text alongside rich text in Evernote? Am I missing your point?

Having said all this, I have a personal solution to this problem: I actually developed a cloud-based sync between Simplenote and Evernote. If my kids and my day job permit, I'll have a closed beta within this quarter of the year - but no promises. If somebody is interested, send me a personal message in this forum with your Evernote username and I'll get back to you.

Stephan

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Oh, and yes, you can use the <pre>-tag. to show plain text in HTML:


<?xml version='1.0' encoding='utf-8'?>
<!DOCTYPE en-note SYSTEM "http://xml.evernote.com/pub/enml2.dtd">
<en-note style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space;">
<pre>
This is a test
Test
above line is empty
</pre>
</en-note>

But as soon as you edit the above note in any Evernote client, you'll introduce lots of other tags - as Evernote client's edit rich text (even the old iOS ones, they were just limited).

So that's why I said, you'd need a new plaintext mode for all Evernote editors. This is possible, but not that easy as writing an Emacs mode.

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So that's why I said, you'd need a new plaintext mode for all Evernote editors. This is possible, but not that easy as writing an Emacs mode.

Yeah.

Evernoted. With a bullet.

I was just thinking about how to respond to the prior posts when I ran into your posts. You said it much better than I could have.

And yeah. Sending PM now for potential beta.

PS: I have been, slowly, investigating options for reliable non-destructive storage of true plaintext in Evernote. The use case is code.

Snippets, yeah, that can be done. Code Management is a whole different class of application. Dropbox and Revision Control is the state of my art at the moment.

Edited by Owyn
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So that's why I said, you'd need a new plaintext mode for all Evernote editors. This is possible, but not that easy as writing an Emacs mode.

Yeah.

Evernoted. With a bullet.

I was just thinking about how to respond to the prior posts when I ran into your posts. You said it much better than I could have.

And yeah. Sending PM now for potential beta.

PS: I have been, slowly, investigating options for reliable non-destructive storage of true plaintext in Evernote. The use case is code.

Snippets, yeah, that can be done. Code Management is a whole different class of application. Dropbox and Revision Control is the state of my art at the moment.

These are really helpful observations. The use case is code, as you indicate, or little languages such as Markdown and its variants. Even snippets, if cut and pasted from the intertubes (excepting github) can get further corrupted by rich text formatting when moving them in and out of evernote. This prevents me from keeping, say, blog posts as Markdown in Evernote, because pasting from the evernote editor to a WordPress site that accepts Markdown doesn't always work.

I'd be happy with options besides a full-blown plain text support. schalker's ENML editor is one, and would be my definite choice if I didn't use emacs all the time. In the Evernote client, if "simplify formatting" completely stripped formatting, that would be good enough. But it doesn't quite do that, so my best option is to use the evernote mode in emacs, which runs w3m as a background process to generate plain text output, which I can sling around as needed.

[Added in edit] The open API that Evernote provides is one of the great things about the product and the company. Little gripes like mine ("wahh, I want plain text") are not really right for a thread that is titled, seemingly, based on concerns about Evernote's strategy. I don't share those concerns. It wound up here because that particular functionality came up earlier in the thread.

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That makes me happy that I'm not the only one who wishes to focus on note-taking. It's fastest and easiest to preserve an idea as raw text, without formatting. And, as others have said, there's other uses as well, such as for code snippets and other things that must be preserved exactly, without corruption, as they are passed around various systems. I've never used Simplenote before. Unlike Evernote, Simplenote seems to be moving in this direction. Is it a viable alternative? Perhaps I should migrate my data there? Any pros/cons that would be useful to know about Simplenote?

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To get around the ENML/plaintext incompatibility, what about being able to insert plaintext objects into a note? Everything in the object could be true plaintext and the rest of the note could be status quo. Does this sound feasible?

When I write code, I use TextWrangler, but I like to keep a record of the CLI calls I make while running scripts so I have a record of exactly what was done when and am able to link to the results. I used to try to keep these records in Evernote, but the formatting is so abysmal (and I got tired of paste and undo being entirely unpredictable) that I've had to keep these records elsewhere and my organizational capacity is decreasing steadily. If anyone has any suggested workarounds that would maintain proper formatting and improve organization, I'd love to hear them.

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i feel your pain coldjoy. what about attaching a text file? it is a sad workaround, but perhaps it would help the organization.

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The open API that Evernote provides is one of the great things about the product and the company. Little gripes like mine ("wahh, I want plain text") are not really right for a thread that is titled, seemingly, based on concerns about Evernote's strategy. I don't share those concerns. (I) wound up here because that particular functionality came up earlier in the thread.

Me too!

How exactly would you like to use plain text alongside rich text in Evernote? Am I missing your point?

How about a third paste shortcut (paste = with formatting, paste without = match formatting, paste as plaintext), which wraps the content in a 'capsule' which simply interprets the tabs and newlines in the clipping?

How about faintly outlining that capsule to allow a user to see its bounds, and treat content within as sacred plaintext (which is still represented using CSS), so the underlying content would remain:

"This is a test\n Another test, indented"

Maybe this means that the plaintext content is rendered each time on-the-fly, rather than being converted to html?

Is it naive to wish for something like the Wordpress interface? That offers me semantic markup / WYSIWYMean, and the CSS styles (which I'd like to style using user.css ). I bet it would convert to filesize saving for many users (my notes are riddled with <span> styling.

Another thought:

the way textedit.app works - a note is RTF or plaintext, no mix. That seems simple enough...

  • Step one - create a seperate doctype for plaintext
  • Step two - extend the journal linking function in EN so that a plaintext note could be displayed in an iframe inside a formatted note? Clicking on the iframe would switch to the original (seperate) plaintext note. Complete the edit there, hit the back button to see it in context again. That way, modes are not mixed.

Mad ramblings? Wishful thinking? there seems to be a lot of energy around these questions, for which I'm grateful :)

Cheers, Tim

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As far as plain text support goes, many plain text editors already exist, right? ;)

Yes, but none so cleanly integrated across multiple platforms, clients, and "the cloud", than Evernote. That's what drew me into Evernote in the first place: the ability to take my notes (originally written over many years of PalmPilot usage) and put them someplace where I could get to them more easily. The earlier versions of Evernote that I used at first, really impressed me, by their ability to function as quick note-takers. However, it seems that the product has evolved more to the point where it's trying to be a word processing engine, not a quick general note-taker. When I enter notes these days, I spend more time trying to fight the automatic formatting, font changes, indentation changes, line spacing collapsing, and so on, than actually entering notes. It's a real distractor, and oftentimes by the time I get access to the note, I find myself forgetting what I wanted to enter!

Amen. One of the recent updates seems to have screwed up the ability to paste into a note and have it readable. Even if there was an option like in M$ Word to view the formatting that would help. I've had some rediculously squirrely things happen recently in EN. Open/create a brand new note, paste a URL into it as text (no extra characters before or after), then move the cursor to another part of the note to type text. When I try to add other text (typed in) or delete extra lines, the cursor jumps up to the top of the paragraph! Insanity. It didn't behave like this until sometime in the last few weeks....and I can't believe this is intended behavior.

To have to paste anything into a text editor, then paste it back into EN, is completely ludcrious, and against what EN is supposed to be for.

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i found this thread looking for plain-text options with Evernote, and i know it's getting stale, but i would like to assert two more use cases for plain text:

1) i want my notes to have a long life: i'd like them stored in a baseline format with as little cruft as possible; i foresee a day (hopefully decades away) when Evernote is obsolete, or costs a whole lot to use, or something equally stoppifying, whereupon i will be faced with extracting my notes from the ENML; storing as plain text now makes me more comfortable with the future

2) Python-style implicit outlining: having used many outliners, and being a Python coder, the hierarchy implied by indentation is part of my quick note-writing style; while i can use this within Evernote, it tends not to hold up well mixed with content pasted in from elsewhere; if i had a reliable plain-text mode, i could interoperate Evernote better with a text editor that can handle my outline style (e.g. providing indent/unindent commands, and folding)

to add to my motivation, there are long-standing bugs in the note editor on OS X; once there is implicit formatting involved, cut and paste can be unreliable (deleting something i didn't cut, not pasting something i did cut); even assuming these will be fixed someday, plain-text would be a way for me to avoid these bugs

(i also concur with the Markdown and code storage use cases for plain text)

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hi sporobulus. i am a fan of real plain text as well. as for no. 1, though, you can export your notes as html and then strip out the html tags to create a plain text document. it is laborious, and not exactly something i think i would like to do, but it is an option under the current system.

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Html is pretty reliable format, considering that internet is a collection of html pages... I doubt you'd even want to strip out anything.

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Html is pretty reliable format, considering that internet is a collection of html pages... I doubt you'd even want to strip out anything.

Depends on how you want to use the plain text file.

Converting HTML to Plain Text has been around for a long time.

Usually this means removing all HTML tags and that HTML <P> and <BR> tags are converted to CR and LF characters.

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Html is pretty reliable format, considering that internet is a collection of html pages... I doubt you'd even want to strip out anything.

Depends on how you want to use the plain text file.

Converting HTML to Plain Text has been around for a long time.

Usually this means removing all HTML tags and that HTML <P> and <BR> tags are converted to CR and LF characters.

If you want to edit evernote notes outside of evernote with a text editor then the best option would be to just edit html.

If you want to read and edit html with any plain text editor without bothering to deal with html tags then the best option would probably be to convert it to markdown language.

Makes sense to convert to plain text only if notes don't have anything useful other than plain text. Otherwise you loose useful information.

Html is pretty good, much more versatile than plain text but also pretty much as reliable. You can't go wrong with HTML, no need to limit yourself to plain text.

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May, you don't have to sell me on the virtues of HTML rich text. ;)

But there are some use cases where you only want plain text.

Of course, most apps will allow you to Paste as Text, or if the app is text only pastes on plain text.

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Both plaintext and rich-text have their advantages. Evernote just doesn't have a nice plaintext editor and probably never will.

I use Evernote, but I also love plaintext and use Simplenote for entering text, but the link to Evernote was still missing.

So I scratched my own itch and created a cloud service, which syncs all plaintext notes in Simplenote with Evernote. It's currently beta and the future depends on the feedback I get. But if you are interested, you can go to http://simpleforever.net and signup for a beta account.

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