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burkedroppings

(Archived) What a company

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Remember that scene in The Social Network when Sean Parker says, “A million dollars isn’t cool, you know what’s cool? A billion dollars.”?

Well, we don’t think a billion dollars is all that cool either. You know what’s really cool? Making a hundred-year company.

That’s a pretty big deal; not many companies make it anywhere close, but we sort of signed up for the task when we started talking about earning your lifetime trust. You plan on living a long time, right?

So when we make any big decision, whether in fund-raising, or product design, or partnership strategy, we ask, “Would this make it more or less likely that we’ll be around in a hundred years?” And if the answer is less we don’t do it.

I just referred to today's blogcast from EverNote CEO Phil Libin in a thread not many folks are likely to see. I'm seeking a larger audience because I think the CONSISTENT attitude of the leaders of this company is just exceptional. A focus on the customer's needs and on constantly striving to improve one's product is too often lost in the shuffle as startups with great potential go for the cash instead of for the opportunity to make the kind of difference that transcends profits.

I'm very pleased with the product. I'm discarding hard copies of many documents I've held on to for decades. I'm trusting EverNote to live up to its promise and be around for 100 years, carefully porting my "stuff" into newer and better versions.

I'm pretty sure that 100 years hence no one will be interested in a few gigabytes of information related to my personal life and times. But I hope I'm wrong; and I am affected by the fact that EverNote intends to keep my data intact just in case some descendant or stranger might stumble upon my notebooks and somehow find meaning.

EverNote is offering immortality, isn't it? Thats quite a promise, Mr. Libin.

Don't let us down.

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I just referred to today's blogcast from EverNote CEO Phil Libin in a thread not many folks are likely to see. I'm seeking a larger audience because I think the CONSISTENT attitude of the leaders of this company is just exceptional. A focus on the customer's needs and on constantly striving to improve one's product is too often lost in the shuffle as startups with great potential go for the cash instead of for the opportunity to make the kind of difference that transcends profits.

I agree. I have to tell you, I'd get nervous if I heard of some of the key players leaving Evernote. :shock: I also hope they eat healthfully, exercise & drive safely, so they will be around a long time to keep Evernote going in the direction it's gone in the past three years. :lol:

I'm very pleased with the product. I'm discarding hard copies of many documents I've held on to for decades. I'm trusting EverNote to live up to its promise and be around for 100 years, carefully porting my "stuff" into newer and better versions.

I've been going "as paperless as possible" for over five years now. I have some apps & methodologies that allow me to quickly find things in the bowels of my various hard drives. But over the two years I've been using EN, I tend to keep tapering on, adding more & more of the old things into EN along with many new things, each & every day.

I'm pretty sure that 100 years hence no one will be interested in a few gigabytes of information related to my personal life and times. But I hope I'm wrong; and I am affected by the fact that EverNote intends to keep my data intact just in case some descendant or stranger might stumble upon my notebooks and somehow find meaning.

Wow...well, for me, I'm pretty sure I wouldn't want anyone else looking at all my notes! Maybe there should be some sort of kill switch. :lol:

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Wow...well, for me, I'm pretty sure I wouldn't want anyone else looking at all my notes! Maybe there should be some sort of kill switch.

Yes, Burgers, privacy is presently a popular pursuit. It's becoming more of a myth than reality, though -- particularly if you're active online.

I live in a world of ideas and they grow best when shared and when watered, fed, pruned and harvested by as many people as possible.

My life may not be as "interesting" as yours (or my need for privacy is less); I don't really have many private matters. My life is the proverbial "open book," which, by the way, tends to be a rather boring book with a meandering plot, uninteresting characters and a sad ending.

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a rather boring book with a meandering plot, uninteresting characters and a sad ending.

It's your story, so write yourself a happy ending.

(I'm hoping my ending involves a public place, nudity and welter of sardines.)

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Hey Burke,

what a nice story!

I'm also catching myself in throwing more and more important "stuff" into EN and have similar feelings. I'd be lost without EN. This company and their staff is very dedicated, friendly, open to proposals for improvement and churns out better and better versions of EN.

Burgers: Yes, I also hope that they take good care of themselves, eat their broccoli and exercise regularly and don't get obese :(

100 years?? Oh, that is probably long beyond my time on this planet. I don't worry about it. It is not how long you live, it is how many people are happier :D because of your existence.

Wern

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As a premium member, I wish Evernote continued success.

But a company surviving 100 years is very, very difficult.

Consider this:

How many American car companies have there been in the past 100 years?

100?

500?

The answer is over 3,000!

Think of that for a minute. There have been 3,000 different American car companies in the past 100 years and I bet you can't name the 4th largest American car company right now!

Here are just a few that bit the dust:

American Motor Company, Auburn, Buick, Cord, Crosley, De Soto, Doble Steam Motors, Dodge, Duesenberg, Edsel, Franklin, Hudson, Kaiser-Frazer, Marmon Motor, Mercury, Nash, Oldsmobile, Packard, Peerless, Pierce-Arrow, Plymouth, Pontiac, Rambler, Standard Motor Company, Studebaker, Stutz, Tucker, Willys. The list goes on and on.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_defunct_automobile_manufacturers

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There have been 3,000 different American car companies in the past 100 years and I bet you can't name the 4th largest American car company right now!

Darn you. You made me look.

According to Wards the current answer appears to be Nissan.

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