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David Earlwood

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About David Earlwood

  1. Yes - it's hard to judge where to place yourself sometimes on the security-convenience spectrum. We're always getting mixed messages in the marketplace. For example, I was offended by the vulnerability exposed when our credit cards (here anyway) became like cash for purchases of less than $100. But now I do PIN-less waves all the time. (The credit card company's bearing the risk and have assessed that they're making more money overall, I guess.). Personally, I store passwords in the browser sometimes, but never for bank accounts. I've usually thought of second-factor as overkill only because it's not usually mandated. Some second factors can cripple. When my second factor is SMS to my mobile phone I stress over the helplessness I foresee when my phone is lost or out of charge or out of range. What second factor do you use? (I have a bank which requires mouse-based icon selection, another which scrambles a keyboard for the password entry to defeat key loggers.) A brief answer is fine - I don't want to go off-topic, but I don't think this is. Your response would be pertinent to the main question of where/how far you place trust and protect adequately. Evernote is a notebook: do you go through zero, one or two authentication procedures every time you enter a note?
  2. Initially, I think I noted that my history was out-of-date on the web browser. I'm used to that. But when I regained access on my phone, the recent entries were missing there, too. I'd never experienced that. I have nothing since May 2016. Most of my updates have been via the phone - certainly, the recent ones. I believe I've never deleted anything. Since school finished, I've disabled the phone's PIN, so there's an outside chance that the app was activated and operated by pocket rubs. I wouldn't have thought so, though. Thanks for the Twitter tip; will try that.
  3. For the first time in my experience, I had reason to believe my Gmail was compromised. I found "I" had sent an email to a close friend (but not that person's main address - their scarcely used Gmail one) using language I don't use. Email December 6. I reset my password soon after. Today, I found that my Evernote account was asking for a password and not accepting the one that I knew I'd assigned it. When I reset the password and regained access, I found that I'm missing all recent notes. I've only been a baby Evernote user, but depend on it occasionally for some account numbers etc. Fortunately, not for passwords. I haven't got Premium, and gather from searching the web site that this is my only way to record my problem, short of establishing Premium membership. I will probably establish Premium membership - if only in order to get an activity history log. Can someone though confirm whether - given that I I haven't been a Premium member - the activity history for my past account weeks will be available to me? Thanks - spent some time looking for an appropriate place to post this - sorry if it's not ideal. PS I'm on an old Android phone. I think syncing was out of date. Google Play services is broken on my phone and I can't upgrade apps. On my version, there's no "Support" option on the button with three dots ('...'), and no therefore no activity log option.
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