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evernote_user_682048

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About evernote_user_682048

  1. OK, so others don't think this is a big deal. That perfectly explains why Evernote can engage in this practice. As you might guess, I don't use Evernote anymore and was recently surprised to see an annual charge. When I did use Evernote, I loved it and was happy to pay. I was careful in picking the word sneaky. I get how auto-billing can be a feature for some users. But after considering the lack of advanced warning, the lack of any grace period for canceling annual subscriptions, and the EULA (specifically the definitely non-standard language related to credit card chargebacks), the totality indicates to me that Evernote has optimized their policies to harvest accidental billing. As I said, nothing illegal -- they just took a page from the gym membership industry. My stupidity cost me $45. That's how I'll remember Evernote which is too bad since I was an evangelist for Evernote and this'll be the story I now tell. A lot of companies might believe that positive word of mouth is worth a lot more than $45. Hence the suggestion to revisit the billing policy.
  2. Can we revisit Evernote's rather unfriendly practice of auto-renewing annual memberships without any notice? I get that you need to make money and that quietly billing people is a great way to make money from people who aren't paying attention. On the other hand, users who love and use your product will happily continue to pay. Being a good corporate citizen would be as easy as emailing an annual auto-renew email 30 days before the renew date. While Evernote's billing practices are neither illegal or deceptive, they are a little sneaky. Thanks
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