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BobTheBuilderOfThings

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BobTheBuilderOfThings last won the day on November 7 2013

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About BobTheBuilderOfThings

  1. "Not providing a feature you advertise" has absolutely nothing to do with programming. And please post where you think EN is advertising something they are not providing.There is nothing "below". And to clarify, images (not just JPGs) AND PDFs are searchable, but PDFs are a premium feature. The fact that images use a different indexing technology than the PDFs is a good thing b/c that is more appropriate b/c images are not text. They are just a bunch of pixels & simply cannot be indexed in the same way text can. Ok - I want to wade into this as a Mac (and iPad and iPhone) Premium user who wants and needs this exact same thing that the OP asked for. This response from BurgersNFries appears to confuse the issue. There are actually TWO kinds of PDF's: Those that are text (and vector) based, and those that have images embedded. BurgersNFries is referring to the first kind. For that kind of PDF, her response makes sense. However, the kind that the OP and I both need to have indexed is the second kind: PDF's with images of handwritten documents embedded. There is no reason that Handwriting Recognition (HR) on an image embedded in an PDF should be any more difficult or different than HR on a JPG or PNG. It seems like a totally arbitrary distinction. But with one important difference for the end user. If I scan my many pages of handwritten notes as images, then they are just loose collections of image files with no structure. Then I must rely on Evernote to "keep them together" and if that fails for any reason, I'm totally screwed. Whereas a PDF nicely bundles the image files together into one package. That's why I use it. That's why most of the scanning apps I use prefer to output PDFs. That's the same reason the OP was using it, and at least one other poster here. So I'll re-ask the original question that the OP posted: why doesn't Evernote do HR on these PDFs? If I don't find a solution in Evernote, I will promptly get all my info out of it and find another solution (or go back to the desktop-based program that I was using).* * And, no, the solution that another person posted here of exporting everything, converting to images or doing manual HR, then re-importing into Evernote is NOT AN OPTION. I'm using Evernote to save time, not to waste it. Thank you. That was much more helpful than my sarcasm. I also really, really appreciate and agree with the last sentence, "I'm using Evernote to save time, not to waste it" !!!!!!! Once Evernote starts wasting my time, I'm done. Windows and Google (among others) are really good at search too.
  2. That's a helpful idea. Thanks for the suggestion. I will probably do that in addition ... but my hope is that my PDFs will be OCRed, and then (as OCR technology advances over the next 5 - 15 years) the OCR will gradually get better.
  3. Thank you. Those are helpful ideas. But I'm not complaining about Evernote's OCR technology being bad or not recognizing my handwriting. I don't expect anything like perfect results from that. What I am speaking about is the fact that PDFs aren't OCRed at all. In particular, as someone who attends professional conferences, I often have handwritten notes taken in or around important typed material.
  4. "Not providing a feature you advertise" has absolutely nothing to do with programming. And please post where you think EN is advertising something they are not providing. There is nothing "bel And to clarify, images (not just JPGs) AND PDFs are searchable, but PDFs are a premium feature. The fact that images use a different indexing technology than the PDFs is a good thing b/c that is more appropriate b/c images are not text. They are just a bunch of pixels & simply cannot be indexed in the same way text can. By below, I meant above, I guess in this context, when I replied to gazumped's more detailed and thoughtful response. I am going to go ahead and stand by my original statement that not OCR'ing handwriting in PDFs is a bad idea. Perhaps spending a bit of time wiki'ing PDF would be helpful for you to understand why "different indexing technology" is not a good thing.
  5. No, it's not bad programming. http://discussion.evernote.com/topic/29830-ocr-confusion/?p=160751 As a software engineer (and as a consumer), I would say that not providing a feature you advertise is bad programming. Though to be fair, Evernote now makes clear that only JPGs are searchable. Please see below for a more indepth response.
  6. I'm not saying that Evernote is a terrible company. And I'm happy that their website now reflects that only JPGs are OCRd. I'm happy with most things that they do. But this is a key, vital oversight for everyone trying to capture large volumes of information. For example, social workers: Just load all 300 pages of notes on this ONE child abuse case as individual IMAGES, and then TAG them with the specific case, and the source, and the people that wrote them, and then hope they never get out of order. That's like throwing everything into a shoebox. Then you can search the shoebox and type out any notes you find again by hand. Not a good solution. A PDF at least is like using a file folder. And if I'm going to buy OCR software, why even bother having a premium subscription that provides OCR in Evernote in the first place?
  7. I see what you are saying. I hope that is not true. Because that is really, really bad programming. Wow. Almost unbelievably bad. That's like having a calendar app that can post from your desktop to your phone, but not from a web client. Anybody have any other suggestions/advice on how to get handwritten pdfs ocr'ed?
  8. I scanned several handwritten notebooks to pdf at high quality resolution several months ago. But none of the pdfs have become searchable yet. I am a premium user. How long is the wait to OCR these pdfs?
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