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Nathan T

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Nathan T last won the day on December 25 2019

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  1. Thanks, and sorry for the duplicate. My preferred view is actually the Top List view actually—I always have to toggle to the Snippet view just to see reminders. So since it only happens in snippet view, I guess I'll just toggle to card view for that purpose instead! Thanks again.
  2. It appears this may be intentional, but it's a real drag on my workflow so hoping it's an oversight, or could be re-thought. As of the latest update, when clicking a reminder in the windows desktop client, the list automatically scrolls to that note. (Whereas before it would open the note in the note view pane, but would leave the list scroll alone, at the reminders.) Since I'm normally trying to go through several reminders at once, it's super annoying having the list jump down to some random location (based on when the note with the reminder I've clicked happened to be updated) rather than stay with the reminders section. And I'm not sure what the benefit is, since you can do any dragging or other operations on the note from the reminder itself.
  3. Disabling CFG appears to have dramatically sped up my Evernote as well. Unfortunately, it appears it's all or nothing—you can only disable it for the whole system. Evernote: can you fix the interaction with CFG so it doesn't dramatically slow down things like copying notes between notebooks?
  4. Yep, which is what I've been doing; the only problem with that is that you don't get a link back to the email, so you need to search for it back in gmail. Not the end of the world, but I save a lot of emails as part of my workflow, so I'd love to avoid it.
  5. Title says it all. I was excited to see that the web clipper now supports gmail, but unfortunately it appears that it doesn't work with gmail's preview pane feature enabled, which I can't live without. Any chance you could fix that?
  6. My web clipper recently updated to version 6, and I can't seem to figure out how to choose the notebook and tags for a clip. It used to be that the dialog would allow you to select both, but now the only options relate to the format of the clip, not where to put it. If I click on the Options button at the bottom of the dialog, I can set the default notebook and tags for all clips, but I don't see anywhere to set them for the particular clip being taken. Was this ability removed? If so, why? If not, could you help me find it? Thanks. Edit: additional info. I tried turning off 'smart filing' in the options dialog, but there is no change. (And with the old web clipper, I had smart filing on, and it helpfully preset tags, but I still had the ability to change them.) Also, I notice I can't select the "Always start in" option for Notebook. Both the radio button and select box are non-functional.
  7. From my point of view, this comment is the key to the whole issue. If tags for shared notebooks were automatically placed in their own distinct namespace by default it would solve the problem of tag pollution, removing the motivation behind the current limitation. Plus, it would really improve the tag auto-complete experience (both in the main programs and in things like the clipper), since if this option were chosen, those shared notebook tags could be suggested for autocomplete only if that notebook was selected. (And so you could feel free to create a large number of tags, which is often valuable for shared (read: work) notebooks, without worrying about bogging down your personal tagging process.) In the meantime, a workaround to that problem is to add a unique prefix character like % or ^ to all tags in a given shared notebook. If you have many shared notebooks, you can use the same prefix character for all, followed by the notebook name. Another option if you decide to go the route of using keywords instead of tags is to keep a master 'keywords' note listing all your 'official' keywords in whatever structure you prefer. Of course, these sorts of manual processes are more prone to error.
  8. "...this is a 'nice to have' but there are many other things more pressing!" I don't disagree with you there, especially if all it does is warn you when you try to clip a duplicate url. However, I think knowing immediately when you land on a page whether you've clipped it before (with the clipper icon lighting up or changing color or something) would be considerably more valuable and even more in line with the Evernote philosoply you mentioned. Plus, it would be far less obtrusive, avoiding the 'thick and fast' warnings problem. The only downside is the technical issue jbignert mentioned. I suggested one sort of work-around to that if they wanted to crank it out quickly. Another option would be to keep a dedicated index in the EN database to allow for quick url-matching, making that operation less resource-intensive. Plugins like the Xmarks one I mentioned and social bookmarking ones like Delicious do those sort of operations on every visited page, so it can definitely be done. And since it happens completely asynchronously with the flow of clipping, even if it took a few moments to return the info, it wouldn't delay clipping pages (or slow down any aspect of evernote). Worst case, it would take a moment for the clipper icon to light up upon hitting a visited page, which obviously would be no worse than now. Anyway, the EN devs seem like smart folks, so I expect this is all old news to them and they've got a set of priorities that make good sense!
  9. BTW: You could use something like X-Marks to sync your bookmarks between browsers and devices, which would solve that part of the problem. I'm a little bit tempted to just make a habit of hitting the firefox bookmark star (which just dumps things in 'unsorted bookmarks', which I don't use anyway, every time I clip something actually. It won't be perfect, but I'll avoid a lot of those accidental re-clippings, and it'll be nice to see at a glance that I clipped a page before. It won't catch everything (probably won't do it on other devices since it's more of a pain to bookmark), but won't hurt. Makes me think, along with this, it'd be cool to have an analogous 'reject' button. Wouldn't have to be something associated with Evernote, just an idea that came to mind. Like an anti-bookmark, so next time you land on that page you can see immediately from the icon that you've already parsed it and decided it isn't worthwhile. Edit: Ironically, X-Marks does exactly that as well! They have a 5-star rating feature for individual URLs. It links to your X-Marks account, so you can see your rating next time you hit the page. So instead of bookmarking things I clip, I might just star them instead. Anything worthy of clipping would be 5 stars, and I'll only 5-star things I've clipped. And junk that I don't want to waste time on can be one star. Hmmm...
  10. For sure, I agree that part alone wouldn't be useful for everyone, but it'd be a start for some of us. On second thought though, it wouldn't seem to be too resource intensive to just keep the bookmarks folder in sync with EN. The web clipper would need to send a request at login and periodically afterward to check whether there were any web clippings added to or deleted from the EN library since the last check. Since the polling wouldn't have to be too frequent, and the queries would be limited to a short time index, I would expect it to work pretty well. Bookmarks in that folder could then be added or deleted as necessary to sync with recent changes in EN. (Perhaps less often and/or manually it would also want to check the whole library in case the bookmarks folder has been mangled somehow.) If you are pruning bookmarks from the folder as well, the tricky part then becomes the UX. You'd want to make sure the user doesn't go messing with that bookmarks folder, without the option seeming overly complex. Maybe just a warning modal when the option is enabled? Or the web clipper could monitor the folder and give the user a message if they manually add a bookmark there. Anyhoo, just some ideas in case they help! Edit: And yes, it would definitely be technically easier to just check and give a warning when the user goes to clip, but then you have that wasted mental energy I mentioned. Seeing that it's clipped as soon as you land on it would accomplish the same thing without the back and forth, and might even jog your memory to related stuff.
  11. Thanks for the reply! I was actually thinking a bit more last night about how this might be implemented without that overhead. What about an option in the web clipper to automatically add any page you clip to a folder in your browser's bookmarks? You could then use bookmarks instead of history in the way you describe, which would be much more reliable. And in fact, you wouldn't necessarily even need to do anything else, since the built in browser interface would then show that the page had been clipped (or bookmarked). A bit trickier would be keeping that bookmarks folder entirely in sync with EN, but that wouldn't be necessary for the feature to be useful. It could certainly be left out of the initial version, for example. The auto-add to bookmarks folder option alone would be pretty cool.
  12. You know what would be ideal? If for every page you visited, the evernote browser plugin sent a request to your library to check whether you've clipped that exact url. If so, the web clipper icon would change color. (Just like the bookmark star in the browser.) That way there'd be no back and forth "oops, I already clipped that!" or whatever. It'd just be immediately obvious. If you haven't been to the page in a long time, you'd have a reminder that it was clipped at some point in the past, which might even prompt you to search for related stuff you clipped the first time around. Or to check whether the page has changed. Or just to not bother clipping it again. Super handy, and unobtrusive. Until then, maybe there's room for a third party developer to make an add-on that does just that? A toolbar icon that would automatically run an evernote search for web clippings with the url of any page you visit, and light up if matched, with the ability to click on the icon to open that note. I'm no plugin developer, but maybe someone out there is and would like to take a crack at it?
  13. Hi, I'm wondering how I can add a description to a web clipping from the windows client, if I didn't do so when I originally clipped it. If I add a description when I clip a note, there's a description line above the clipping, a horizontal separator, then the content. But if I don't, that space isn't there. I can edit the content itself, so I can get keywords in, but I'd like the appearance to match descriptions of other web clippings. In theory I could manually add a line with my description then add a horizontal separator, but the css of many web clippings doesn't actually allow you to 'push' it down with carriage returns. (Try clipping this post as an article for example. It was an EN forum post that I first noticed this behavior on.) Hopefully I'm just missing the 'add description' option somewhere! Thanks.
  14. I don't know, it seems pretty straightforward to implement a basic version of this. You wouldn't have to catch every duplicate; if you miss some, it's no worse than now. So you could focus on eliminating the false positives you describe. For example, the warning could appear only if you're clipping an identical url to the same notebook where you have the same url clipped already. (As opposed to simply the same site or a similar url.) I can see how trying to match the contents of a full article clip might be too resource-intensive to give this immediate feedback, but it could at least check whether you've clipped the same page recently; say within the past month. If so, it's likely you've simply forgotten you already clipped it, and a notification would be helpful. Seems to me checking for an identical url, notebook, and date range is something that could be done in under an hour by a knowledgeable developer. The slightly more time-consuming part would be the UI, but they already have the notification on clip option, so it should be pretty straightforward to put something in there. (And indeed, it already shows you 'similar' pages you've clipped, which is very similar to this request; this would just be a more obvious warning for an identical page.) Edit: All that said, I'm intimately familiar with the tradeoffs developers have to make, and with the fact that there are nearly infinite features out there that would be both useful and not too hard to code, so some always end up taking priority over others. Just lending my voice as someone who would like to see this particular feature move up a notch or two.
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