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ScottLougheed

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Everything posted by ScottLougheed

  1. Strangely it is not. I imagine we'll see that in an update in the near future.
  2. 1) When you are scanning the card itself, immediately after scanning you should be given the option to modify/add/correct basic fields such as phone, fax, address, name, etc. 2) After you are finished scanning, locate the newly created contact note, if you are on your iOS device, when you are in the contact note, you should see "edit" in the top right (on iPhone). Tapping "edit" allows you to add/remove/modify fields.
  3. Ok so this is a Mac thread, you might not have suitable advice here since you are a windows user. For windows, make sure you are following the directions as per the advice from Evernote Staff: The thread can be found here: https://discussion.evernote.com/topic/53834-evernote-for-windows-520-rc-a-much-better-sync/?p=262886 Other threads for windows users and classic note links: https://discussion.evernote.com/topic/54765-copy-note-link-change-in-functionality/ https://discussion.evernote.com/topic/54638-new-en-520-copy-note-link-behavior-is-unusable/ https://discussion.evernote.com/topic/55064-copy-note-link-now-linking-to-web-based-version-of-note/ https://discussion.evernote.com/topic/57002-altered-behaviour-copy-note-link/
  4. I am using Evernote Hello, I did not realize there is a business card feature for the main app. Does it integrate with Evernote Hello? Dave It isn't so much something that would integrate with Hello as much as something that would replace Hello altogether.
  5. from my response to your other post Depends on what device you are using. On the desktop applications and the web interface, right-click on any notebook and select "delete notebook". On iOS, from the home screen of Evernote, select "notebooks", then tap "edit" in the top right, then tap the green circle with a line. On android.... not sure.
  6. When you follow the various methods documented here and in several other threads, do you see the "copy classic note link" text? Does that still only provide the http:// link?
  7. And you need to click "get started" at https://evernote.com/contact/support/ to start the support submission process.
  8. This is actually an interesting observation. I too cannot find any setting for this on the Mac. Evernote shows up in System Prefs>Security and Privacy>Privacy as having access to my location information but not my calendar info. I'll have to pay a bit more attention to whether it is suggesting note titles on my mac at all... I'll have to dig further into this too. Perhaps suggested note titles are considerably scaled back on desktop for some reason... Not having it in the web seems reasonable. Integrating location awareness in the browser is a bit of a chore. Tying into your calendar server-side (if it isn't google calendar) would be very hard and would only work for a select number of services, so many users would find themselves without note title suggestions if they use something like iCloud or don't sync their calendar at all, and a browser isn't going to have access to the locally stored calendar (because if you're logged into www.evernote.com on my computer, you don't want my calendar information informing your note titles.
  9. Not a card munch user so I cannot test, you'll have to try yourself, or contact Evernote support. If you had a card munch account that is still active, it sounds like you should be entitled to free scanning. From the link in the original post: "Connect to LinkedIn for a complementary year of business card scanning Business card scanning is a Premium feature in Evernote. As part of the partnership with LinkedIn, Evernote is offering business card scanning to LinkedIn users. LinkedIn users who connect their Evernote accounts with LinkedIn get one year of complementary business card scanning. CardMunch users who transfer one or more cards to Evernote get two years of complementary business card scanning."
  10. I am not an android user but I believe you can upgrade through the google Play store. You can also upgrade at www.evernote.com.
  11. The offer of two years of card scanning was specifically for those transitioning from the now defunct CardMunch to Evernote. No matter what though, NO, your data will NEVER be deleted and you will never lose access to that data. Once the offer to CardMunch users expires (two years after the accept the offer), they'd need Evernote Premium to continue unlimited business card scanning. Anything they did in those two years will remain in tact no matter what.
  12. 1) You are right, it is applied to the entire body of the note. My mistake! 2) The current release of Evernote for Windows is v5.x so you appear to be one major release behind! 3) THANKS for clarifying the windows hotkey.
  13. try selecting some formatted text and pressing ctrl-alt-f on a windows machine. (NOTE: This has NOTHING to do with pasting. You select existing text, THEN use the key combination)
  14. Doesn't cmd-shift-f work for your needs? Select whatever text you want, cmd-shift-f and POOF the formatting is gone.
  15. I know a lot of people have many existing scans that they'd like to convert to this nice new contact note format, so I hope that Evernote considers making such a posteriori linked-in connections possible.
  16. Not sure if you are a windows or mac user, but if you are using a Mac, the stock PDF reader (Preview.app) will rotate PDF pages, either by doing a rotating motion on your computer's trackpad or by pressing cmd-l (thats an L), or cmd-r, to rotate "left" or "right".
  17. I don't think it is too much to ask. I think this could be very useful. There are a few things to consider though. 1) This would mean any data encrypted this way could not benefit from any server-side processing like OCR, or any of the features that require the server-side indexing. 2) This would mean, as you have already noted, that data could be relatively easily lost, which could increase support load and require additional support resources. This isn't a reason not to do it, but it is a reason to be careful about how and when it is implimented. 3) I am not terribly knowledgeable about this kind of stuff, but I wonder if de/encrypting might be difficult to implement on all of the mobile platforms that Evernote supports? As such there would have to be careful consideration about how to negotiate this sort of thing and make sure users are aware that, for example, they might not be able to access their encrypted data on the BB10 devices, or whatever. (AGAIN this is my ignorant speculation!). 4) I suspect decrypting would require that the entire note(book) content be downloaded and (temporarily) stored locally on mobile devices in order to be de/encrypted since this cannot be done server-side. This could be challenging for devices with limited space. It also means that anything encrypted would not be searchable on a mobile device unless it was downloaded in its entirety and then decrypted. Again, none of these are reasons NOT to do it, but the do suggest that there could be some significant complications associated with such a feature, and that less savvy users (and even some savvy users) might encounter some frustrating situations. In the technology world that we live in, very little is not possible......all of these issues can be worked out if it is an area of interest of the vendor. Encrypted data may have to wait for a local sync to the user's computer before indexed and synced back. Users would have to accept the fact that maybe the data processing would have to take place locally as a 2nd stage encryption password may be envied to provide true "zero knowledge". I think we have beaten this topic up enough. I am not sure who reads these blogs at EverNote, but I may reach out to the CTO and make the suggestion. You are right, on a computer, you can rely on local processing (however, Evernote would have to write this into their desktop client, as currently this is all done server side, so this would be a bit of an undertaking). Getting this to work at all on a mobile device will be considerably more challenging. Yes it can be done, perhaps it should be done, but if it is going to happen, it isn't going to happen tomorrow.
  18. I don't think it is too much to ask. I think this could be very useful. There are a few things to consider though. 1) This would mean any data encrypted this way could not benefit from any server-side processing like OCR, or any of the features that require the server-side indexing. 2) This would mean, as you have already noted, that data could be relatively easily lost, which could increase support load and require additional support resources. This isn't a reason not to do it, but it is a reason to be careful about how and when it is implimented. 3) I am not terribly knowledgeable about this kind of stuff, but I wonder if de/encrypting might be difficult to implement on all of the mobile platforms that Evernote supports? As such there would have to be careful consideration about how to negotiate this sort of thing and make sure users are aware that, for example, they might not be able to access their encrypted data on the BB10 devices, or whatever. (AGAIN this is my ignorant speculation!). 4) I suspect decrypting would require that the entire note(book) content be downloaded and (temporarily) stored locally on mobile devices in order to be de/encrypted since this cannot be done server-side. This could be challenging for devices with limited space. It also means that anything encrypted would not be searchable on a mobile device unless it was downloaded in its entirety and then decrypted. Again, none of these are reasons NOT to do it, but the do suggest that there could be some significant complications associated with such a feature, and that less savvy users (and even some savvy users) might encounter some frustrating situations.
  19. I think in this case the best practice would be to wait until you get back to a wifi or cellular connected zone (your hotel, a cafe, whatever) to do your scanning.
  20. As we have seen in the last few years, even some of the most robustly secured cloud services are vulnerable when hacking occurs. This is not to excuse Evernote's current state of security, which is not terribly different than a lot of mainstream cloud providers, and could be improved. Rather what I am saying is that ANY cloud is vulnerable when hacking occurs. In most cases, even highly secured cloud storage services will be compromised, it just takes longer. EDIT (OOPS this time I really did get my posts mixed up!) Keep in mind that data mining and being hacked are two very different types of events. You (and others in this thread) might also be interested in this blog post from several years ago: Evernote's three laws of data protection
  21. Yes, to be absolutely clear, my post was not directed toward you, and I never claimed it was you writing about data mining. I was responding to EvernoteUser78 whose post is directly above mine. And, as BnF suggested, if you are keeping medical notes, I would absolutely NOT put that data in the cloud if it could be avoided. You might consider DEVONThink, which has some facilities for LAN sync, so you can keep several devices in sync via your local network rather than transmitting your data over the internet. Now, you'd have to ensure you have a very secure (hopefully offsite) backup as well, since there is no centralized storage like with Evernote. But, you'd also have to make sure you are complying with whatever regulatory requirements you are bound by with respect to storing patients' data.
  22. I don't believe Evernote does much in the way of data mining. They aren't an ad company like google. Most of their need to access your information is so that it can be processed by their OCR system and any indexin it does on the server. These aren't really revenue generators for them. Your concern about a breach is valid, and Evernote isn't trailing too far behind any other mainstream cloud service provider. Definitely there is room for Evernote and many others to improve, but I really don't think we'll see zero-knowledge encryption, at least not any time soon. Anything that is really that sensitive should perhaps not be out in ANYBODY'S cloud. Even the best of companies have proven to be vulnerable. In the mean time, documents that are sensitive could be encrypted by you before adding to Evernote, that will keep those contents reasonably safe. I am curious thoug, what is it that makes you think Evernote is generating money off users' Evernote contents? Is there something in their terms of service or their privacy policy? Have they started an ad agency a la google that I haven't heard about?
  23. 1) It is not clear to me that DOESN'T want us to encrypt our data. Granted, encrypting our data with no serverside knowledge of the encryption would prevent any server side services like OCR.... but again I don't think Evernote is against the possibility of users encrypting. 2) Evernote does give us some level of protection for our sensitive data. In the desktop clients users can select any amount of text and encrypt it. Web and mobile apps can decrypt any encrypted text. So, they do give SOME protection. 3) I imagine increasing security is on Evernote's radar, especially with their push into business, but offering the server side processing and cross-platform features they do will be hard to juggle with intensification of encryption, so it is not something that they can just jump into willy nilly.
  24. This already exists (in an admittedly limited form). In any notebook you can select the little tag icon to list all the tags used in that notebook, and you can select one or more tags to drill down to notes in that notebook tagged with one or more of them. See the following screenshot: https://www.evernote.com/shard/s25/sh/c9c06baf-e5c6-4e12-9786-295944968ebb/4ef9b1414e0c2f92d569e017b19c0157 With respect to the other concerns: Only the tags YOU have used in the notebook you share should get transported to the person you shared it with. If you have tags that are used in other notebooks than this shared one, those tags don't come along for the ride. One of the main reasons for this is that you might set up (and impose) a tagging structure on your collaborator. It is worth noting that anyone you share with cannot add a tag that isn't already used somewhere in that shared notebook. So the person you share it with can only ever use the tags that you've already used. If your tags didn't come along for the ride, the user wouldn't be able to apply any tags to notes in that shared notebook! (this is, of course, to protect you from an influx of crazy nonsense tags from the person or people you shared with, the corollary consequence being that the person or people you share with get your mess, but I think the idea is that the sharer [you] are technically an administrator and this is to give you control over how tagging is done and what tags are used). That being said, I think how tags get handled with sharing notebooks is a bit clumsy. I really do hope that Evernote is working to refine how this works. Indeed, I think the actual magnitude of the problem has really emerged with the release of Evernote Business. If you look in that community forum they struggle with tags in much the same way that other users do (except, perhaps, on a much larger scale). I hope (and suspect) that these growing issues, especially as Business has made apparent, will spur some polishing (or outright fixing, depending on how you see it) of tags and shared notebooks.
  25. Evernote is tight-lipped about their development plans so whether they are working on more or not is mostly a matter of just waiting and seeing. There are some challenges with export due to the richness and variability in note content. Plain and rich text are reasonably easy to export, but web clippings and other stuff that might have some underlying HTML is a bit more of a challenge. The HTML and XML are the most straightforward because the results will almost always be predictable regardless of content. Pages is especially hard since it is a highly proprietary format and Word is not much better, and both will very likely produce highly inconsistent and likely terribly erroneous results with most things that aren't just straightforward plain text. This could be extremely frustrating from a UX standpoint, as users expect their notes to look more or less the same on export, but in the end some might look terrible! Then begins the trial and error process of figuring out how to manipulate the troublesome note so that it exports properly, and probably failing at that. The exception is that you could likely get HTML exported files into Word without much fuss, then from there into just about anything else, but the workflow might be a bit onerous. I think direct PDF exporting would be the most likely pursuit because PDFs can reasonably faithfully reproduce the rich content often found in notes and is almost universally readable (editability is a different matter, but it sounds like you and many others are not too concerned about editing, more about viewing/sharing/read-only archiving). Evernote is ALMOST there in this respect, since you can already print individual notes to PDF. It would be great to be able to do this in a batch and end up with a PDF containing all the selected notes. So, in the meantime, if you want to get a bunch of notes into a single PDF, here's a few workarounds that come to mind: 1)Merge and print Select all the notes you want to archive, copy them to a new, temporary notebook. In this new notebook using the copies, MERGE them all into a single note. Print as a PDF this single note containing all the notes. Then delete the originals or the merged note, or both, or whatever suits your needs. Troubles: The order of notes upon merging is a bit haphazard, I believe it is dictated either by the date created or date updated. If you are merging a small number of notes, this is relatively easily manipulated by hand to dictate merge order. If you have a large number of notes, it's a real pain. 2) Select all notes, print as individual PDFs, combine in external application Select all the notes you want to bind together. On mac, you can just select print/cmd-p and it will bring up a single dialogue box no matter how many notes you have selected. Print these to a PDF and you will end up with one PDF per note, with the note title as the file name. Using an external application (such as Preview on Mac, not sure about windows. Perhaps Adobe Reader, but Acrobat sure could. PDF Expert on iPad would do this well too) combine these separate PDFs into a single PDF file. This is likely the best option as you can use note titles to sort the order of the resultant PDF, it will not manipulate your formatting (merging as in (1) adds header text for each merged note), and you can take advantage of any optimization features in your external PDF application. Hope this helps a bit!
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