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Improve Note-list / Note-content command-line consistency &/or take advantage of existing inconsistency


Idea

  1. When I click on a note in the note list, my focus is on that note.
    I often want to search within that note.
    But at that point, Ctrl-F does nothing.
    Ideally, Ctrl=F should initiate the search operation in that note.
    That implementation would improve interface consistency.
     
  2. Alternatively, take advantage of the inconsistency, and disable Ctrl+N when typing in a note (or make it an option).
    (I just bought a keyboard with a different layout. The "B" & "N" keys, which were so nicely divided on my ergo keyboard,
    are now adjacent to each other. So I keep pressing Ctrl+N when I intend Ctrl+B. I'm convinced I need to return to my
    ergo keyboard, but as long as the Note-list and Note-content panes are already inconsistent, we could take advantage of it.)
     
  3. Adopt a policy of benevolent inconsistency, and implement both options 1 & 2.

Thanks for listening!

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1 hour ago, eric_treelight said:

When I click on a note in the note list, my focus is on that note.
I often want to search within that note.

Find (ctrl+F) is tightly bound together with Find and replace.(Ctrl+H or via the three dots in the find menu). It therefore makes sense to me that it only works when the note is in edit mode. You can quickly flip the note into edit mode, when you already have it highlighted in the note list, by pressing <enter>.

1 hour ago, eric_treelight said:

and disable Ctrl+N when typing in a note

I assume you do use ctrl+N, and just disabling it completely (which you can do) isn't going to work. You could disable it completely and use alt+ctrl+N which is the global shortcut for creating a new note in a new window. In my opinion having shortcuts that only work in a certain context should be avoided wherever possible and adding another would be a bad move.

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11 hours ago, Mike P said:

Find (ctrl+F) is tightly bound together with Find and replace.(Ctrl+H or via the three dots in the find menu). It therefore makes sense to me that it only works when the note is in edit mode. You can quickly flip the note into edit mode, when you already have it highlighted in the note list, by pressing <enter>.

I assume you do use ctrl+N, and just disabling it completely (which you can do) isn't going to work. You could disable it completely and use alt+ctrl+N which is the global shortcut for creating a new note in a new window. In my opinion having shortcuts that only work in a certain context should be avoided wherever possible and adding another would be a bad move.

image.png

Nice! I create new notes much less often than I add to them. So alt+ctrl+N might just work. I'm refurbishing my MS "Natural" ergonomic keyboard. That will solve the problem, too. But thanks for the tip! (After using it for a decade or two, my synapses are attuned to that keyboard layout and distances between keys. I'm making a ton of other mistakes on the keyboard that came with the new computer, so I'll be retiring it shortly. In the meantime, I totally understand the reluctance to make context-dependent keyboard assignments.)

Thanks for the Enter key to go into edit mode, too. I'll make it habit to click a note and press it, so I'm where I think I should be after opening a note. (I guess some people open notes for reading, without the ability to edit them?? Weird. To me, it's kind of like opening a document in Word, and then having to click "edit, please" to do anything with it. But I guess there are users and use cases out there where the implementation makes sense.)

As for me, I'd like an option that says to always flip into edit mode when I click a note!

In any case, thanks for the thoughtful response!

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