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EverNote for Windows 64-Bit and ARM64 builds needed!


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Hi,

Is there a plan on your roadmap to update EverNote to 64-Bit and ARM64?

EverNote for Windows is the ONLY platform where it's still a 32-Bit only app and in 2022 this is particularly embarrassing. This is also a problem on Windows on ARM PCs, like the Surface Pro X. There's a noticeable delay in opening EverNote and in general usage on ARM PCs.

Microsoft doesn't even make a 32-Bit build of Windows 11. There's no good reason to still be coding in 32-Bit this late in the day.

What is the plan to make EverNote modern and replace the 32-Bit build with 64-Bit + release an ARM64 build?

Thanks.

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Hi.  I see you've been pushing this bandwagon in all your 5 postings since 2019.  What exactly is the issue here?  Does Evernote not run in your current OS,  or is it the browser that's the issue?  If you've been around for all that time you must have realised that we're (mostly) not Evernote here.  To get your point across you'd better off feeding back to Evernote or raising a support ticket. 

In any event most big companies won't comment on when or whether future developments might happen - it gives competitors a chance to keep up with your every new feature,  and users will be disappointed - usually very loudly - if a feature gets stalled.

I have no idea what flavour Evernote now is - I imagine since it's an Electron-based app it will depend what options that envelope provides.

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This is the first time I've posted about ARM64. I couldn't find a post on the subject so started one. I won't be the only user of Windows on ARM.

If you mean 64-Bit, 3 posts since 07/2021 isn't a lot. It doesn't seem like a lot to me anyway. Odd comment.

In any case it's unhelpful to point out how often someone asks a question, better yet to just help. I've posted a total of 5 times in 3 years, not enough to have must've realised.

You're saying EverNote don't read their official forum? This is feeding back to EverNote.

Fair enough you're irritated by my question but seems odd to be, it's a perfectly fair question really. Anyway, this is a waste of our time, I'd like to concentrate on the issue in question.

If you don't use Windows this post isn't for you, if you do, you'd benefit from a 64-Bit and/or ARM64 build too.

Thanks.

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In any case I said in my comment above what the issue is, every Windows on ARM user will be having the same technical issue with EverNote. I didn't mention web browsers.

Fair point on developers not announcing their roadmap but it doesn't mean users shouldn't post their issues and feedback. This way others can do the same and EverNote we should expect will see this. Electron is available in 64-Bit (see WhatsApp, Facebook Messenger, Microsoft Teams) and ARM64 (see Teams again).

EverNote being 32-Bit only is causing issues for users of Windows on ARM PCs and this is the "Technical Issues" subforum.

With EverNote being 32-Bit only in 2022 it's fair to ask what a developer's roadmap is on 64-Bit and ARM64. Lenovo just announced their first Windows on ARM PC, this is alongside Samsung, Huawei and Microsoft.

And all OEMs have only sold Windows in 64-Bit since roughly Windows 7, back in 2009.

Thanks.

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4 minutes ago, Bradavon said:

If you don't use Windows this post isn't for you, if you do, you'd benefit from a 64-Bit and/or ARM64 build too.

I do use Windows and Linux on 64-bit machines,  but ARM (I thought) is a relatively new development with which I have no experience.  Doesn't Evernote work on Qualcom-based kit?

-And Evernote staffers will get around to reading posts here,  but there's a lot of traffic and it won't necessarily be soon,  or generate any sort of response.  Best option is still feedback via an app,  or raise a support request.

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Simple Answer: Because ARM on Windows sucks - as long as Microsoft is linked up with Qualcomm, no improvement in sight.

The only ARM based technology that is currently working on desktop level is Apple Silicon. The EN Mac client is running natively on it (after quite a wait), Mac M1 users are happy.

On Windows use the web client.

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Just now, gazumped said:

I do use Windows and Linux on 64-bit machines,  but ARM (I thought) is a relatively new development with which I have no experience.  Doesn't Evernote work on Qualcom-based kit?

-And Evernote staffers will get around to reading posts here,  but there's a lot of traffic and it won't necessarily be soon,  or generate any sort of response.  Best option is still feedback via an app,  or raise a support request.

Windows on ARM has been around since 2016 and properly since 2019 with Surface Pro X.

Things really took off in 2020 with Apple's M1 MacBooks and I see EverNote do have both 64-Bit and ARM64 builds for MacBooks:

It's fair to at least ask EverNote do the same on Windows.

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7 minutes ago, PinkElephant said:

Simple Answer: Because ARM on Windows sucks - as long as Microsoft is linked up with Qualcomm, no improvement in sight.

The only ARM based technology that is currently working is Apple Silicon. The Mac client is running natively on it (after quite a wait), Mac M1 users are happy.

On Windows use the web client.

This is just not factually accurate.

The sole issue with Windows on ARM is 32-Bit/64-Bit emulation, of which EverNote is part of this problem. There are no performance issues using Windows on ARM with Snapdragon chips with ARM64 optimised apps. I'm guessing you've not actually used a Windows on ARM PC.

On Windows 11 they're very capable, but to respond to your point Qualcomm's exclusive contract with Microsoft expires this year. Mediatek are rumoured to be releasing a Window on ARM chip too.

In any case none of this is relevant to a developer supporting a platform.

Mac M1 users are happy because EverNote pulled their finger out and did the developing. It's fair to at least ask EverNote do the same on Windows.

p.s. I use the Web App on ChromeOS but it shouldn't be the go to on a platform as mature as Windows.

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6 minutes ago, gazumped said:

A great light (finally) dawns.  I agree - it's fair,  and you should ask.. subscribers can raise queries here - https://help.evernote.com/hc/requests/new and Free users here - https://twitter.com/evernotehelps (or use the feedback option in the mobile client) 

 

Just for the record the first link says this, which brings me back here:

image.png.80756b28795e49117ee6e85e181a1063.png

I appreciate if I were a paid customer, I could also raise a Support ticket. But as a Free customer this is a better place than Twitter. The benefit of a forum is other users can see posts too.

I don't get why I'm being actively discouraged from posting technical questions in EverNote's own recommend place to post technical questions.

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18 minutes ago, Bradavon said:

I don't get why I'm being actively discouraged from posting technical questions in EverNote's own recommend place to post technical questions

Because these are user-to-user support forums, and the specific issue you raise isn't something any of us can help with. You can post here but there will not be any useful responses. As the link you posted makes clear. This is where you 'Talk to other users...': All we can do is suggest alternative ways of working etc.

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…. and developing a new version (even if it only means swapping the Electron release) will cost a significant amount of money.

Ever thought about contributing when asking for something ? I have no problem with the Free model, but in my opinion who is sailing on a shoestring should be prepared to accept  things as they are.

P.S. The perspective of maybe getting a Mediatec ARM chip as a competition to Qualcomm is not really encouraging. Mediatec is pretty much known for basic processors, underperforming in most benchmarks except maybe power efficiency. And Surface Pro X is not really a match for even a base specced MacBook Air.

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24 minutes ago, PinkElephant said:

…. and developing a new version (even if it only means swapping the Electron release) will cost a significant amount of money.

Given that Windows 64-Bit is used by millions porting to at least 64-Bit Electron would make financial sense.

24 minutes ago, PinkElephant said:

P.S. The perspective of maybe getting a Mediatec ARM chip as a competition to Qualcomm is not really encouraging. Mediatec is pretty much known for basic processors, underperforming in most benchmarks except maybe power efficiency. And Surface Pro X is not really a match for even a base specced MacBook Air.

Fair point but then who?

Qualcomm are considered the best in the business next to Apple and you've already said you think their chips are poor. It seems you're against the platform in general.

That's again just not factually true. Surface Pro X has the same low power, low heat, no fans, instant on from sleep as MacBook Air M1. Its performance is comparable to an Intel Core i5 and besides this is the EverNote forum. How much performance are you inferring EverNote needs?

Yes the M1 is a better SOC than the Qualcomm 8cx Gen 2 no question but millions of people buy PCs with Intel Core i3's remember. A capable Windows PC doesn't need to match M1, it needs to work well. Remember the majority of Windows users aren't buying Intel Core i7 or i9 PCs.

For me personally I find my Surface Pro X very capable. I literally only have issues with EverNote and Spotify, they're the only Windows apps I have to use under emulation. You'll find the majority of negative Internet comments around the platform are by users who've not actually used it.

Unless you need a PC for Gaming or need the Dropbox/Google Drive Sync clients I'd recommend a WoA PC to someone. In terms of heavy hitters Microsoft Office, Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Lightroom are optimised for both M1 and Windows on ARM. I imagine Adobe are working on Premier Pro too but haven't kept up on it.

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  • Evernote Staff

It appears the Windows App Store version is misconfigured for 32 bit only.  Direct download version from the website supports both.  Looking into it.  Thanks for bringing this to my attention.  ARM version is slow because of emulation just like the M1 until native support was added.  Adding new platforms is costly and adds additional requirements for testing and technical support.  Desktop versions already supported - Windows App Store, Windows Direct Download, Mac App Store, Mac Direct Download, Linux.  And then there are platform variations - X86, X64, and M1.  There is also testing requred to support Windows S Mode.  This is not including the mobile versions.  M1 support was added because many Apple device users tend to buy the latest and greastest versions as they come out.  This is not true for Windows users.  We have many users still on Windows XP using the legacy version.  Adding a new platform such as ARM or Raspberry Pi needs to make sense from a business perspective.  In the meantime, if you need 64 bit, switch to direct download instead of App Store.

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17 minutes ago, RMorgan said:

It appears the Windows App Store version is misconfigured for 32 bit only.  Direct download version from the website supports both.  Looking into it.  Thanks for bringing this to my attention.  

My EverNote comes from the Microsoft Store. I prefer this route as EverNote is one of the few properly Packaged Store apps, therefore offering a central/silent update process. Thanks for the info a 64-Bit build is available though.

Do you mean you can download 32-Bit or 64-Bit here? -

https://evernote.com/download

I ask as the page only offers me one download and doesn't say whether it's 32-Bit or 64-Bit. Making me think 32-Bit is only available or does it detect the Bit during installation?

Its annoyingly common developers don't make all their versions available on the Microsoft Store. Appreciate this sounds like a mistake here.  Firefox and VLC only offer the 64-Bit build, despite both having ARM Optimised versions for download.

17 minutes ago, RMorgan said:

 ARM version is slow because of emulation just like the M1 until native support was added.  Adding new platforms is costly and adds additional requirements for testing and technical support.  Desktop versions already supported - Windows App Store, Windows Direct Download, Mac App Store, Mac Direct Download, Linux.  And then there are platform variations - X86, X64, and M1.  There is also testing requred to support Windows S Mode.

Thanks RMorgan your points are entirely fair. The main reason for posting was to start the conversation. Two thoughts:

  • Do you really still need to offer a 32-Bit build of the Current Builds? Uptake must be low.
  • Isn't the Windows on S Mode version the same as the Windows Store App?

Fair points though, thanks for the update bw.

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@RMorgan Thanks for explaining a little.

You opened a big issue here: EN on Raspberry Pi ! Wow, just go ahead.

Just to mention it: I am using the EN web client on my Raspberry 4 / 4GB, not overclocked, in the Firefox ESR. It is not challenging computers 10 or more times as expensive, but it works pretty well. It allows me to use EN as a code library, bringing code from my Mac to the Pi via EN.

Maybe the Linux client will work with Debian (RaspberryOS is a Debian flavour) - would be interesting. My Raspi boots and runs from an SSD - it should have enough speed to support a full client. And the 4 core ARM CPU is really not bad - tough little guy. It is running a Pi-Hole, a VPN server and a print server in parallel, without even getting warm.

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  • Evernote Staff

Linux builds use an X86/AMD64 build.  Windows ARM uses ARM64.  Raspberry Pi uses ARM71.  Compiling is bad on the RP4 and I have to reduce the memory footprint down to 3GB.  I've had it running on the RP4/8GB but one of the background threads keeps dying and restarting.  I can't get resources right now for anyone to work on it unfortunately.  I spent some time on it during Hack Week end of last year.

DDL version contains both 32 and 64 bit versions and will use the appropriate one based on the current platform.

Windows S Mode is more restricted and we've had to make some modifications.  I know Apple ID logins don't work on that version right now.  External Editing had some issues but should be resolved if the temp files are saved to a good location that's not virtualized by the OS.

Just for the heck of it I turned on ARM64 builds on Windows and it built a huge installer that must have had all 3 (32, 64, arm) versions in it.  I don't have hardware to test.  Just thought it was interesting that it combined them into a "universal" build.  I'll see if I can get some of this work prioritized and get an ARM laptop.  QA would need machines too.  It all depends on business focus and value return.

I'm hoping to set up an "experimental" area where we release unsupported versions for advanced users who want to play around and take the risk.

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It does run pretty well (yeah, a bit slow, but what do you expect …) on my R-Pi 4/4 GB using the web client in Firefox ESR.

I don’t think it is a problem to continue with the web client. When the Linux client runs properly on a PC-grade computer, fine with me.

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2 hours ago, RMorgan said:

DDL version contains both 32 and 64 bit versions and will use the appropriate one based on the current platform.

Thanks. It works. I'd prefer long-term to switch back to the Store version, being one of the few properly packaged apps it makes use of Windows Store Update process. The less App Updaters the better in my book. But it's definitely a small thing. 64-Bit is an improvement.

Can I suggest the System Requirements are updated to make clear there is both a 32-Bit and 64-Bit build. All it says is:

Windows 10 (32-bit and 64-bit)

I assumed it meant you'd get the 32-Bit build on both 32-Bit and 64-Bit Windows.

2 hours ago, RMorgan said:

Just for the heck of it I turned on ARM64 builds on Windows and it built a huge installer that must have had all 3 (32, 64, arm) versions in it.  I don't have hardware to test.  Just thought it was interesting that it combined them into a "universal" build.  I'll see if I can get some of this work prioritized and get an ARM laptop.  QA would need machines too.  It all depends on business focus and value return.

Thank you. These will be of interest to you:

11/2021: A $219 Windows on Arm PC is finally available for developers - The Verge
Dated Today: Project Volterra: Microsoft announces Windows 11 on ARM developer kit with Qualcomm SoC | Windows Central

2 hours ago, RMorgan said:

I'm hoping to set up an "experimental" area where we release unsupported versions for advanced users who want to play around and take the risk.

I'd be interested in some type of Insider programme.

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These apps are Native Windows on ARM:

Microsoft Edge
Microsoft Office 365
Microsoft Teams
Microsoft OneDrive Sync Client
Zoom
Google Chrome (unreleased 😪)
Mozilla Firefox
Adobe Photoshop
Adobe Lightroom
VLC Media Player
Spotify (Beta released on 30/04/2022)
Leonardo Photo/Drawing Editor
Cisco AnyConnect VPN
Viscosity VPN
WireGuard VPN
7 Zip
FileZilla
Netflix for Windows

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