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How fast are physical scanners that scan directly to evernote?


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Hello,

In my quest to go paperless in my home, I have switched for a little over a year to Evernote + Filterize. I am now looking for a physical scanner to up my game because scanning letters using my phone can take forever, since I generally let it accumulate for a few weeks before processing it.

I recently found this rather old video demonstrating scanning to evernote with the brother ADS-2600W and it left me scared:

it takes a total of 8 touches, and 1 full minute of processing time for a 3 page document. Scanning is quick, but it's a fraction of the 1m30s that each document takes.

This is a far cry from what I'm looking for. Realistically, counting the times where I start doing something else or phase out, it would take me 45 minutes to scan 20 documents. Way too slow. sitting next to my scanner for 1 hour every two weeks, with long off times, and constant repetitive manual work is very frustrating and boring.

If a single touch scan could be programmed, and the processing was done in the background, scanning itself would take 10 seconds for a 3 page document. This is the type of performance I'm looking for, since 20 documents could realistically be processed in 5 minutes, before letting the scanner, filterize and evernote do the sorting work in the following hours.

Is this something that exists? How do you manage to scan multiple documents quickly, simply and efficiently? What is the fastest way to scan and add documents to evernote?

 

A few more notes on what I'm looking for:

  • I would much prefer to avoid turning on my computer before scanning things.
  • Ideally I'd prefer if the scanner uploaded it directly to evernote, but I can survive with a onedrive/dropbox/google drive integration, since I can then use auto-import folders in evernote to add them next time I use evernote on my computer.
     

Thanks a lot for reading.

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  • Level 5

Scanning with my iPhone is fast, using the app ScannerPro from readdle. The build in scanner of EN iOS is not bad as well.

For volume scanning I use the ix500 (which is phased out, the new model is called ix1500). It holds up to 50 pages, scans front and rear in one go. I usually scan to my Mac using the ScanSnap Manager software. Digesting the pages is instantaneous, the OCR of the last pages of a larger job will take a few seconds.

To move them into EN I use the Import Folders feature. It is better to give the file a good name and have EN create a note with that name as title, instead of using the default title from the scanner, and change the title later.

The scanner is faster than you can refill pages and handle the files coming out of the process.

The ScanSnaps can scan as well into a smart phone instead of into a computer, or into a cloud service.

 

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There are two parts to the scanning process.  Creating the image to be saved (including converting to the desired file format - typically jpg or pdf). Then importing into Evernote.  The image creation piece is what takes the time and depends on the scanner being used. Importing into Evernote is quite quick.  My scanner saves directly into Evernote. Perhaps 30s to scan and convert a page (I haven't timed it) and almost instant saving into Evernote.  If the scanner scans to an import folder then the imprting takes a few seconds for the image to recognised by the Import Folder process but then it is also immediate.

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  • Level 5*

Hi.  You may be aware that Filterize is closing down in 12 months,  and various interested users on here (including me) are looking for a replacement service.  There are separate threads on this in the Forums here.

On scanners,  I'd broadly say that I run a fairly paperless workflow,  of which scanning is such an integral part that I don't consider the activity a separate time-sink. My attitude is to scan and save documents unless there is a very good reason not to.  In my case,  unless an item is too big or too valuable to feed to the scanner,  I mainly use an old ScanSnap S1500 - the modern equivalent is the ix1500 - a sheet fed scanner which operates at 30ppm.  I'm office based,  so it scans to a hard drive folder where I can batch OCR the files (I find it quicker than OCR on a pre-scan basis) and edit files and file names where necessary.

If I'm processing user guides or other printed material I'll try to find a version online rather than re-scan something locally.  If the item is too big (etc) to scan I'll use my tablet or phone Evernote app to take pictures.

Depending on availability (and to some extent whim) my other sources for 'scanned' images are: my Epson scanner/ printer,  an Epson photographic scanner,  and my DSLR.

The ScanSnap will operate without a connected PC,  but you're then subject to the time it takes to save possibly large files to the server.

It's important to OCR,  because indexed files are easier to find;  and (IMHO) it's important to name the files with something relevant - some of my early scans have impenetrable code name/ note titles,  so it's a little difficult to find the top-secret maps if they're not labelled as such...

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Thanks for all your answers. Sucks for filterize, didn't know. Really hope Evernote incorporates some of the features as part of its premium plan.

So one document will feed at 30 ppm, but what if you have 10 documents instead? Can you immediately immediately start the next job or is there a long processing time where one is left ot stare blankly at the screen before going on with the next document?

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  • Level 5
20 minutes ago, Puredwige said:

So one document will feed at 30 ppm, but what if you have 10 documents instead? Can you immediately immediately start the next job or is there a long processing time where one is left ot stare blankly at the screen before going on with the next document?

This is really a function of the particular scanner and associated software.  You might be better identifying a selection of candidates and then asking about these in particular.  My experience with my trusty ScanSnap s1300i and the scanner built into the multi-function printer that I have may not tell you anything of value in choosing your product.

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  • Level 5

The ix(1)500 can scan directly into EN as well. But I found it more work to modify the resulting note than to create a clean file first, and then drop it into the import folder.

The ScanSnap works through profiles. You create a number of them, and select the most adequate for the scanning job.

You can select in the profile to get an individual file for each page, or one file comprising all pages in the sheet feeder.

For a single page you just want to store in EN the apps build in scanner fed by the mobile app is often the most efficient solution.

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One of the first things I set up when I started using EN 11 years ago was scanning with auto-filing. Now that I'm off EN I miss this feature. Here's what I did. Keep in mind that this doesn't work with the free version of EN and I'm scanning on a business class machine: I set up my scanner to scan to my EN email address. I'd pop the item in the feeder, pressed two buttons, and bam! the scan would appear in the Unsorted folder for me to file more specifically.

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  • Level 5

Good alternative to send it by email - I just don‘t like the email „envelope“ coming along with the scan. I really prefer a pristine new note, with a good title that allows me to tag and then move it to its notebook without a need to open the attachment again.

The ix ScanSnaps are scanners used in SoHo and mid sized business environments. I bought my ix500 when I decided I will go paperless, even when it is only serving me and my freelance business. I would not try to cut my budget on the scanner, it is a real time saver to have a robust, reliable device. Many people think the scanner in a multifunction printer will be sufficient - from my experience it won’t.

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