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lob

How Do I inform Evernote about my product?

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I have a product that allows meals to be planned, and a shopping list to be sent to Evernote from a PC. My problem is, I do not know how to go about informing Evernote of this product, without it being treated as SPAM. Could someone on Evernote staff contact me perhaps? I can forward details, allow with a promo code for a free download.

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The easiest way - since this is a user forum - would be to go for Premium for 1 month, and channel it through support. Maybe you stick with Premium and use the additional features for your idea.

Good luck with your product.

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Thanks PinkElephant.

I just upgraded to Premium. I'll contact support shortly.

 

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So, after an email exchange today, Support suggested that I post a link to the product here. Note: the product is free until June 1st, just use the promo code chef101. At this stage, I'm really just after a small userbase so I can get some feedback.

https://www.leorecipesystem.com/

 

 

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22 hours ago, lob said:

Support suggested that I post a link to the product here.

Also post details about the product
Important points are:

LEO Recipe System is designed for meal planning, shopping lists, recipe creation & storage, nutrition analysis, label creation, and recipe costings

the product is Excel based, and restricted to Windows

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It's Excel based and NOT an app. It runs on a PC. Each Recipe file creates what I call a "compressed recipe". This is "bundled up information" on the recipe covering ingredients, amounts, nutrition info, categories, etc. The compressed recipe is approx 320 characters in length, and contained in a single cell. It is essentially the same a database record.

You copy/paste the compressed recipe to other files, such as Shop (for meal planning and auto-creation of a shopping list) and Extras (for labels and costings). 

Evernote works from the Shop file. Open the Shop file, plan meals, and select the SHOPPING LIST worksheet to see the auto generated shopping list. Then, press the Shop button to send to Evernote. (Look under Features, Shop on the website to see a video on how Evernote is integrated into the recipe system.)

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21 minutes ago, DTLow said:

Important points are: the product is Excel based, and restricted to Windows

At this stage it is only Windows based. However, it might be possible to produce a Mac version. To be honest, I don't know enough about the Mac version of Excel to know how feasible this would be.

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15 hours ago, lob said:

At this stage it is only Windows based. However, it might be possible to produce a Mac version. To be honest, I don't know enough about the Mac version of Excel to know how feasible this would be.

...and you have the complication that Office is now also web based and can be accessed from Linux too...

I had a quick look at the web page,  but to be honest our cooking plans tend to revolve around personal preferences and what's left in the freezer rather than any rational 'plan'.  Good luck with the development though!  🙂

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I actually agree with you gazumped. I'm not a "foodie", and I mostly cook so-called "boring" non-recipe meals. Last night: fish fillets (steam-cooked in foil in the oven), boiled potatoes and some greens. Didn't need some auto-generated shopping list to send to Evernote either! 

However, it is useful when you want to cook "something different" for dinner every now and then, and also for baking where quantities need to be more precise. And in relation to cooking "something different", the recipe system will generate ideas for you: suggest categories to look at, list all (category) cake recipes, pick a random recipe, and so on.

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No fair. You're making me feel hungry now...  :D

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I learned cooking while at university. Open the fridge, look at what is in there (take the sixpacks out before for better vision of what’s behind), and produce a meal from it.

It went on from there, and today I am doing whatever I like, mostly from fresh regional produce. At the moment we have asparagus season ...

An app I like is Kitchen Stories. The design is clean, there are little videos linked to the recipes where you can take a quick look at critical steps or learn new tricks of the cooking trade. The ingredients list come with a servings calculator. To calculate the quantities, you up or down the number of servings, the quantities are recalculated, one click, it goes to a groceries list, and you are done for shopping. Or in the open-fridge-and-take-a-look situation, you can search for available ingredients and check what might be possible by combining them.

IMHO a solution that needs EN, an Office account and technical links that will only work on a PC is probably something for a professional environment. They can take advantage from the data created, for example to calculate the value and profit margin of the meals offered. For a little home cooking it is probably sort of an overkill.

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Granted you need a PC. However, I use Excel 2010. You don't need to use a subscription-based version of Office/Excel. And, the product will work with the free version of Evernote.

There is also Nutrition data generated. I know this probably isn't that I'mportant for most people, but maybe it should be. 

Apart from the "professional" use (eg cafe owners), another use might be Nutritionists providing their clients with recipes (eg 50 easy to prepare recipes stored in the recipe folder that meet certain criteria such as low added sugar, low sodium). Clients can then plan their meals, and create shopping lists, without everything being so strictly structured.

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Thanks for the initial posting, and the response. As you say it is a reasonable approach for people that need to prepare meal plans on a professional footing. NutritionAl input is important, especially when you have to be aware of conditions like high blood pressure, diabetes or allergies.

We are just cooking for ourselves, family & friends - so our use case is more Based on an iPad somewhere in the kitchen, for a quick reference. We have our recipes in a shared EN notebook, and add our observations while cooking to the basic description provided. So our use case is different.

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