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robert1379

How to delete all evernote in disck

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have been taking notes in Evernote (for Windows) on the computer of my work place. Now I am leaving, and the computer will be transferred to other colleagues.
I have synced all my notes to the cloud. But how can I delete all the note data in the local storage?

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If you want any of that content, you should export your notebooks, individually to .enex format and save those files (if your employment rules allow it) on a USB stick or something before you uninstall Evernote. Of course, those notes are probably also the property of your employer, so you might want to consider what you're doing there.

Anyways, if you want to destroy the database, then before uninstalling Evernote, open it up, and on the main menu to Tools / Options, and select the General taab. Click on "Open Database Folder"; you should be taken to a File Explorer view of a folder that's in a directory something like <USER NAME>/Evernote/Databases. Save that folder name somewhere. Now shut down Evernote.

In File Explorer, go to your database folder (that you saved away earlier). All the files in there that have ".exb" as part of their name comprise your Evernote database. Delete them, and your database will be gone. For that matter, you can go up a lever from the Databases folder, and then delete everything there.  But do not start up Evernote again after this step, or it will try to sync notes back down again. Uninstall it instead. If you really want to be cautious, you could empty your recycle bin, and then use some utility to clean up used disk sectors.

 

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Good advice, Jeff.

I've never been in a work situation like this, but I would think that the employer would have their IT department do a deep-level wipe of the hard drive before passing it along to another employee. "In an ideal world," maybe not necessary. But in that world, there are no computers. You just tell your elf to ride your unicorn over to the well of knowledge and retrieve what you need. :D

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4 hours ago, Dave-in-Decatur said:

I've never been in a work situation like this, but I would think that the employer would have their IT department do a deep-level wipe of the hard drive before passing it along to another employee. "In an ideal world," maybe not necessary. But in that world, there are no computers. You just tell your elf to ride your unicorn over to the well of knowledge and retrieve what you need. :D

My thought is that the employer would do a full backup of the work computer before wiping it, and handing it over to someone new (in fact, if they're smart, they'll do a full backup every so often: I know of a case where an employee left to go somewhere else, and when they tries to boot his computer the next day, they found it wiped clean). But I'm not an IT guy, so I don't really know what best practices are.

Yes, Virginia, there are bad actors out there...

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Doing a standard delete as described is o.k. when the machine will be wiped, and setup anew. This is standard procedure in many companies, and probably you know from your place how they are doing things. When my wife started her new job in a small company, the PC came with all the stuff from the User before ...

You could wipe it yourself (There are free tools in the internet that load on a USB stick and will wipe from there). However, this will take hours if your computer still has a turning disk drive, and still quite a while on a standard SSD. And there may be a legal implication, because the data belongs to your employer - he even paid you to produce them, remember ? If the employer is not doing it, you could offer to swipe it clean for him as  a service,

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