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Historynerd

Evernote provided data to the US Government

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https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/j5yyxp/evernote-search-warrant-gave-data-to-us-government

Care tell us a bit more about this, Evernote?

I know for one thing I will end my subscription and delete my data and account. I am going to use Joplin, which is basically an Evernote clone, but with markdown and the option for local storage or on a Nextcloud instance.

Privacy is important to me and I can't trust Evernote in that regard anymore. Byebye.

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On 12/6/2019 at 1:54 AM, Historynerd said:

Privacy is important to me and I can't trust Evernote in that regard anymore.

Why?  There's been no privacy changes at Evernote

>>Care tell us a bit more about this, Evernote?

We know Evernote is subject to the laws of the country,  and must comply with orders from the courts        
This is nothing new

Personally, I  make sure my sensitive data is encrypted.

>>If you have and hold your own encryption keys, yes. Relying on the encryption that Apple or Evernote provide is not wise. They hold the keys and can supply the key if the court orders it.

Which Is why I personally do my own encryption - I control the keys

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If you have and hold your own encryption keys, yes. Relying on the encryption that Apple or Evernote provide is not wise. They hold the keys and can supply the key if the court orders it.

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2 hours ago, Historynerd said:

I can't trust Evernote in that regard anymore.

My takeaways from that posted article -

  1. "As part of a dark web drug case the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) obtained a search warrant compelling cloud-based note taking app Evernote to provide a user's data, according to court records." - AFAIK every web app's T&C's include a caveat that they'll hold user data completely secure except (some legalese to the effect of) "when compelled to do so by law".  Good luck with Joplin.
  2. To get a warrant the DEA would have to have had enough evidence about this individual to convince a judge that it was legally correct for the authorities to raid his account.  So - no mistakes by Evernote,  no volunteering of account information...
  3. I'm utterly shocked.  That a user would so blatantly disregard Evernote's terms and conditions,  which (IIRC) specifically forbid use in connection with illegal activity...
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2 hours ago, Historynerd said:

If you have and hold your own encryption keys, yes. Relying on the encryption that Apple or Evernote provide is not wise. They hold the keys and can supply the key if the court orders it.

If you have data that you are ... uhmmm, concerned about either use local notebooks or avoid cloud storage all together.

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+1, @s2sailor. Seriously, keeping drug deal records on Evernote? Dumb, not to mention, as @gazumped points out, a direct violation of the TOS. You might as well just start planning what your prison tats will be.

The first two paragraphs of the vice.com article are:

Quote

As part of a dark web drug case the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) obtained a search warrant compelling cloud-based note taking app Evernote to provide a user's data, according to court records.

The warrant highlights how as users increasingly move aspects of their lives to various pieces of software, from ridesharing to note taking apps, that information is often stored remotely on a company's servers and is available to third parties.

My comments:

  1. Good. I'm glad. And if anyone has someone suffering through addiction in their family, or works as a counselor with addicts, they should be glad too.
  2. The second paragraph is an absurd, illogical jump from the first. "Users" -- presumably everyday people living legal and unharmful lives -- are not going to have "aspects" of those lives made "available to third parties" unless they start doing illegal stuff.
  3. Suggestion to an entrepreneur: make an online data storing system that does not preclude illegal activity in its TOS, and that promises not to comply with warrants and subpoenas. Then your drug-dealing and human-trafficking and otherwise evil customers will feel more secure.
  4. Sheesh.
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