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The lost feature: Nested tags in shared notebooks

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#1 thesab

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Posted 11 February 2012 - 01:55 AM

I'm working on several projects where we want to use Evernote to archive large amounts of information. We plan to structure the information using Evernote's nested tag feature. Since these are group projects we use single notebooks that are shared between the members.

When we started the first project last September I noticed that the nested tag list wasn't nested anymore when it was shared. When I contacted Evernote support about it they came to the conclusion that it was a bug. They filed a bug report internaly in their team. I was also assuming it was a bug, since it was working fine in the web client.
I've been looking forward to having this fixed since then. Last week I contacted Evernote support again and asked for an update about the bug fix. The response now was that nested tag list is not an available feature in shared notebooks. This information was supported by the fact that it is now also missing from the web client. So apparently it has been removed from the feature list entirely.

I think this is sad since nested tags are the only practical way to structure large amounts of information in shared notebooks in a visual and user friendly way.

This just as a friendly effort to get it back into the supported feature list.

#2 Owyn

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Posted 11 February 2012 - 03:15 AM

I think this is sad since nested tags are the only practical way to structure large amounts of information in shared notebooks in a visual and user friendly way.

Not sure what you consider large but I personally manage 8000+ notes without functional use of nested tags. And I am far from unique.

Search the forums for "prefixed tags" and "structured titles".
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#3 jefito

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Posted 11 February 2012 - 03:38 AM

...particularly with a poster named 'jbenson2'.
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#4 paulceaston

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Posted 11 February 2012 - 06:59 AM

Evernote needs to step up its game when it comes to its collaboration features. While I agree with other posters in this thread that you can certainly live without nested tags and folders for personal use (I find dumping everything in one bucket, applying multiple tags, and having good search works better than painstakingly foldering everything) but when you start working with groups of people, there is great value to agreeing that certain content will be saved to certain locations. You still want the benefits of folksonomy with free-form tagging, but enforcing directory structures for certain classes of objects has great value and helps keep retrieval of shared information efficient.

Right now Evernote is a great tool for individual use. I recognize this and pay for it. But I see no point in buying my family members a premium subscription and I've not seen a business case for buying it for use in my company. Better collaboration features could change that.

#5 thesab

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Posted 11 February 2012 - 10:57 AM

Not sure what you consider large but I personally manage 8000+ notes without functional use of nested tags. And I am far from unique.


It's no problem to manage a large number of notes without nested tags, as a single user. You can create your own way to tag things, using "prefixed tags" or "structured titles" to simulate real structure. The problem is that this is highly subjective structuring rules. When you work in a dynamic group project it takes time and effort to teach new members these rules. If the rules would change you have to manually change prefixes of every tag and title.
Structuring notes in notebooks and stacks is also easy as a single user. But trying to add and remove permissions to multiple shared notebooks in highly dynamic group projects is just not practical.

You still want the benefits of folksonomy with free-form tagging, but enforcing directory structures for certain classes of objects has great value and helps keep retrieval of shared information efficient.


This is my point too. In a group project setting it is essential to have rules for how to structure things. In projects where people come and go on a regular basis, these rules should be "universally recognisable". Directory, menu and table of contents are examples of well known ways to structure information. All of these use nesting to manage large structures. Most people will recognize and be able to traverse structures like that. That is the reason why I feel nested tags are essential for shared notebooks.

#6 JMichael

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Posted 11 February 2012 - 04:17 PM

Collaboration tools seem to be the hot topic of the week. There must be at least a half-dozen threads asking for collaboration features.

Many of us agree that Evernote Sharing is NOT ready for serious collaboration.
For Evernote Sharing limitations, see sharing / multiple users with update capability

If you need a serious collaboration tool now (or for the foreseeable future), you will need to look elsewhere.





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